Album: Billy Elliot: Music from the Motion Picture

Cover image
Album:

Billy Elliot: Music from the Motion Picture

Artist: Various Artists
Honors:
Genres:
Label: Interscope Records

In a movie all about contrast, a unifying element keeping the emotional content together is essential. That’s achieved by a specific method of song placement. When we see Billy joyously losing himself to the rhythms of “Children of the Revolution”, it is not just a snatch of music bridging scenes. The movie is a modern musical, and these songs have to speak literally (as well as emotionally), with lyrics that explain what no one is actually saying. A group of Marc Bolan’s classics is therefore a stroke of genius as opposed to having new songs written. The other…

Reviews

Amazon.com

In a movie all about contrast, a unifying element keeping the emotional content together is essential. That’s achieved by a specific method of song placement. When we see Billy joyously losing himself to the rhythms of “Children of the Revolution”, it is not just a snatch of music bridging scenes. The movie is a modern musical, and these songs have to speak literally (as well as emotionally), with lyrics that explain what no one is actually saying. A group of Marc Bolan’s classics is therefore a stroke of genius as opposed to having new songs written. The other purposely placed songs from T-Rex include “Get It On”, “I Love to Boogie”, “Ride a White Swan” and “Cosmic Dancer”, which is reprised at the album’s end—the backwards guitar breakdown will haunt you for days. Remaining consistent, there are also three tracks from Paul Weller; one as The Jam (“Town Called Malice”) and two reincarnated as The Style Council (“Shout to the Top” and “Walls Come Tumbling Down”). The only musical incongruity to the 1984 Miner’s Strike setting is the inclusion of two contemporary hits: Stephen Gately’s “I Believe” and Eagle-Eye Cherry’s “Burning Up”. Otherwise, get ready to “lose your blob”!—Paul Tonks

Related Works

Film:Billy Elliot

Billy Elliot

Stephen Daldry

Foursquare in the gritty-but-heartwarming tradition of Brassed Off and The Full Monty comes Billy Elliot, the first film from noted British theatrical director Stephen Daldry. The setting is County Durham in 1984, and things “up north” are even grimmer than usual: the miners’ strike is in full rancorous swing, and 11-year-old Billy’s dad and older brother, miners both, are on the picket lines. Billy’s got problems of his own. His dad has scraped together the fees to send him to boxing lessons, but Billy has discovered a different aptitude: a…

Views: 885 • Modified: • Elapsed: 0.037 sec