Album: Lost in Translation: Music from the Motion Picture

Cover image
Album:

Lost in Translation: Music from the Motion Picture

Artist: Brian Reitzell, Kevin Shields
Honors:
Genres:
Label: Rykodisc

Sofia Coppola has, with two elegant movies, proved herself a talented director with a keen eye for interior life. She’s also got great ears. For Lost in Translation, the story of a May to December friendship in Tokyo between two displaced Americans, the score is a tonic for jetlag. Coppola prescribes a dose of shoegazer pop, from My Bloody Valentine’s chiming “Sometimes” to Jesus & Mary Chain’s fuzzed-out “Just Like Honey”. The music nails the hazy conscious state of actors Bill Murray (as a movie star in a midlife crisis) and Scarlet Johansson (as an…

Reviews

Amazon.com

Sofia Coppola has, with two elegant movies, proved herself a talented director with a keen eye for interior life. She’s also got great ears. For Lost in Translation, the story of a May to December friendship in Tokyo between two displaced Americans, the score is a tonic for jetlag. Coppola prescribes a dose of shoegazer pop, from My Bloody Valentine’s chiming “Sometimes” to Jesus & Mary Chain’s fuzzed-out “Just Like Honey”. The music nails the hazy conscious state of actors Bill Murray (as a movie star in a midlife crisis) and Scarlet Johansson (as an emotionally marooned twentysomething). It also provides a safe, warm envelope in which they can enact their overseas adventures. Working with producer Brian Reitzell, Coppola lured Valentine’s Kevin Shields into providing several slices of dreamy indie-rock and sonic wallpaper, as stylish as it is formless. There’s a welcome bit of Japanese goofiness, a funhouse-mirror reflection of US folk-rock courtesy of early-1970s band Happy End. And a “hidden” track provides the audio of Murray, in the film, doing his sleepy karaoke version of Roxy Music’s “More Than This.” —Marc Weidenbaum

Related Works

Film:Lost In Translation

Lost In Translation

Sofia Coppola

Like a good dream, Sofia Coppola’s Lost in Translation envelops you with an aura of fantastic light, moody sound, head-turning love, and a feeling of déjà vu, even though you’ve probably never been to this neon-fused version of Tokyo. Certainly Bob Harris has not. The 50-ish actor has signed on for big money shooting whiskey ads instead of doing something good for his career or his long-distance family. Jetlagged, helplessly lost with his Japanese-speaking director, and out of sync with the metropolis, Harris (Bill Murray, never better) befriends the…

Views: 406 • Modified: • Elapsed: 0.058 sec