Album: The Motorcycle Diaries: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack

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The Motorcycle Diaries: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack

Artist: Gustavo Santaolalla
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Label: Deutsche Grammophon

Argentine filmmaker Walter Salles (Central Station, Behind the Sun chronicles the epic, 8000 mile motorcycle journey of two friends—one of whom is Ernesto “Che” Guevara—in his compelling story of personal, geographic, and political discovery. Composer Gustavo Santaollala, one of the leading figures in Argentine rock and pop (and the producer behind 2003 Latin Grammy Record and Album of the Year winner Juanes) infuses Salles’ unusual road movie with a multi-faceted score that draws not only on his country’s rich national musical heritage, but…

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Argentine filmmaker Walter Salles (Central Station, Behind the Sun chronicles the epic, 8000 mile motorcycle journey of two friends—one of whom is Ernesto “Che” Guevara—in his compelling story of personal, geographic, and political discovery. Composer Gustavo Santaollala, one of the leading figures in Argentine rock and pop (and the producer behind 2003 Latin Grammy Record and Album of the Year winner Juanes) infuses Salles’ unusual road movie with a multi-faceted score that draws not only on his country’s rich national musical heritage, but on the same restless musical instincts Santaollala brought to his equally haunting music for 21 Grams. As on that score, his primary instrument is again the guitar, though the seductive electric fretwork of the previous film takes a backseat to acoustic stylings that range from indigenous folk-rooted charm to nervous, electronic-backed soundscapes. Further underscoring the score’s expansive, post-modern sensibilities are Maria Esther Zapata’s saucy take on the tango-novelty “Chipi Chipi,” the composer’s own retro-energetic “Que Rico El Mambo” and the evocative contemporary ballad, “Al Otro Lado Del Rio,” by Jorge Drexler. —Jerry McCulley

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Film:The Motorcycle Diaries

The Motorcycle Diaries

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The beauty of the South American landscape and of Gael Garcia Bernal (Y Tu Mama Tambien, Bad Education) gives The Motorcycle Diaries a charisma that is decidedly apolitical. But this portrait of the young Che Guevara (later to become a militant revolutionary) is half buddy-movie, half social commentary—and while that may seem an unholy hybrid, under the guidance of Brazillian director Walter Salles (Central Station) the movie is quietly passionate. Guevara and his friend Alberto Granado (Rodrigo de la Serna, a lusty and engaging actor)…

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