Annal: 1968 Hugo Award for Novel

Results of the Hugo Award in the year 1968.

Book:Lord of Light

Lord of Light

Roger Zelazny

In a distinguished career which produced many bold, award-winning works, this towering tale of invention and adventure may be Roger Zelazny’s single most brilliant achievement.

Earth is long since dead. On a colony planet, a band of men has gained control of technology, made themselves immortal, and now rule their world as the gods of the Hindu pantheon. Only one dares oppose them: he who was once Siddhartha and is now Mahasamatman. Binder of Demons, Lord of Light.

Book:The Butterfly Kid

The Butterfly Kid

Chester Anderson

It was a nothing-special Greenwich Village day…

And good ole Chester Anderson—sometime poet, rock ‘n’ roll singer and self-proclaimed kinf of the Village—strolled along, content. Content, that is, until he saw a kid make butterflies. Real butterflies. The kind with pretty wings that flutter.

What at first seemed amusing, if a little strange, quickly changed. Chester and his ragtag pack of singers, groupies and street-wise prophets had stumbled onto a mind-blowing phenomenon that threatened the whole world. And only Chester an his ragamuffin crew could save it.

From what? From six-foot, blue lobsters from outer space.

How? With a horrifying plan that hinged on the innocence of…The Butterfly Kid.

Book:Chthon

Chthon

Piers Anthony

Chthon was Piers Anthony’s first published novel in 1967, written over the course of seven years. He started it when he was in the US Army, so it has a long prison sequence that is reminiscent of that experience, being dark and grim. It features Aton Five, a space man who commits the crime of falling in love with the dangerous alluring Minionette and is therefore condemned to death in the subterranean prison of Chthon. It uses flashbacks to show how he came to know the Minionette, and flashforwards to show how he dealt with her after his escape from prison. The author regards this as perhaps the most intricately structured novel the science fantasy genre has seen. It was a contender for awards, but not a winner.

Book:The Einstein Intersection

The Einstein Intersection

Samuel R. Delany

The surface story tells of the problems a member of an alien race, Lo Lobey, has assimilating the mythology of earth, where his kind have settled among the leftover artifacts of humanity. The deeper tale concerns, however, the way those who are ‘different’ must deal with the dominant cultural ideology. The tale follows Lobey’s mythic quest for his lost love, Friza. In luminous and hallucinated language, it explores what new myths might emerge from the detritus of the human world as those who are ‘different’ try to seize history and the day.

Book:Thorns

Thorns

Robert Silverberg

Duncan Chalk’s six-hundred-pound frame is nearly as large as his media empire. Beneath the depths of his immense rolls of flab, the fabulously wealthy mogul wields the editorial power to deliver his programming across the solar system to billions of viewers. His newest real-life romance drama is between a starman who survived painful surgical experimentation while in alien captivity, and an emotionally scarred 17-year-old virgin. When the arranged relationship takes off on a whirlwind tour of the antarctic and out to the moons of Saturn, the viewers are swept up in the romance, but Chalk’s true motives are revealed when the doomed relationship begins to unravel…and Chalk can feed on the emotional anguish of the two lost souls.

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