Annal: 1980 Golden Globe Award for Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy

Results of the Golden Globe Award in the year 1980.

Film:Breaking Away

Breaking Away

Peter Yates

Peter Yates’s flag-waving film stands with To Kill a Mockingbird and American Graffiti as one of the best films about small-town Americana. Steve Tesich won an Oscar for his semi-biographical screenplay about four 19-year-olds who don’t know what to do after high school. Dave Stohler (Dennis Christopher) and his three friends—ex-football star Mike (Dennis Quaid), wily comedian Cyril (Daniel Stern), and tough kid Moocher (Jackie Earle Haley)—are doomed to live in the college town of Bloomington, Indiana, where the local kids (nicknamed “Cutters”—a…

Film:"10"

"10"

Blake Edwards

One of the best comedies of the 1970s, Blake Edwards’s ode to midlife crisis and the hazards of infidelity now plays like a valentine to that self-indulgent decade, and it’s still as funny as it ever was. In the signature role of his career (along with “Arthur”), Dudley Moore plays a songwriter with a severe case of marital restlessness, and all it takes is a chance encounter with Bo Derek (in her screen debut) to jump-start his libido. Julie Andrews plays Moore’s wife, who will only tolerate so much of her husband’s desperate need to reaffirm his sexual…

Film:Being There

Being There

Hal Ashby

Thanks to an extraordinary, delicately balanced performance by Peter Sellers, Being There received mixed reviews during its theatrical release in 1979, but has since become a celebrated comedy with a loyal following. It's one of the most unusual black comedies ever made, simply because it stretches a simple premise over 130 minutes of straight-faced, strangely compelling commentary on politics, media, and celebrity in media-savvy America. Adapted by Jerzy Kozinsky from his own novel, the movie's about a simple-minded, middle-aged gardener who, after a lifetime of seclusion and safety in a Washington, D.C. townhouse, gets his first exposure to reality beyond the walls of his sheltered existence. His only reference to the world is through his childlike addiction to television, and when a chance encounter brings him into the inner fold of a dying billionaire (Melvyn Douglas), he suddenly finds himself the toast of Washington's political elite. His simple phrases about gardening are misinterpreted as anything…[more]

Film:Hair

Hair

Milos Forman

The Age of Aquarius is brought to life by the filmmaker who made Amadeus a household word. Milos Forman directed this version of James Rado, Gerome Ragni, and Galt MacDermot’s landmark musical in 1979 between his Oscar-winning films One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest and Amadeus. With mixed reviews (Gene Siskel named it that year’s best film) and lukewarm box-office grosses, the film all but disappeared from the collective consciousness. Yet the film beautifully delivers on its promise to bring the ‘60s back to life. Hair re-creates a…

Film:The Rose

The Rose

Mark Rydell

In an Oscar-nominated performance, Bette Midler portays a rock star whose success is laced with so much booze, drugs and hard-living, it eventually causes her downfall. Trapped in a self-created hell Rose begs her manager (Alan Bates) for time off from her concert tour. When he refuses, she seeks compfort and love in the arms of a handsome driffter (Frederic Forrest), but even he cannot handle her life of excess. Electrifying musical numbers, including the hit song “The Rose” make the film a pop culture classic.

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