Annal: 1989 Festival de Cannes Jury Awards for Feature Films

Results of the Festival de Cannes in the year 1989.

Film:Sex, Lies, and Videotape

Sex, Lies, and Videotape

Steven Soderbergh

Winner of the Palm d’Or and Best Actor awards at the 1989 Cannes Film Festival, sex, lies, and videotape transformed the independent film industry and turned writer-director Steven Soderbergh into the envy of aspiring filmmakers everywhere. Sly, seductive, and coolly intelligent, the movie explores the sexual shenanigans and personal preoccupations of its four central characters, revolving around a selfish lawyer (Peter Gallagher) who responds to his wife by having an affair with her free-spirited sister (Laura San Giacomo). But when the lawyer’s college…

Film:Cinema Paradiso

Cinema Paradiso

Giuseppe Tornatore

Giuseppe Tornatore’s beautiful 1988 film about a little boy’s love affair with the movies deservedly won an Oscar for Best Foreign Film and a Special Jury Prize at Cannes. Philippe Noiret plays a grizzled old projectionist who takes pride in his presentation of screen dreams for a town still recovering from World War II. When a child (Jacques Perrin) demonstrates fascination not only for movies but also for the process of showing them to an audience, a lifelong friendship is struck. This isn’t just one of those films for people who are already in love with the…

Film:Too Beautiful for You

Too Beautiful for You: (Trop belle pour toi)

Bertrand Blier

In the films of Bertrand Blier, love is a virus that sends its victims on a feverish fling of impulsive passion before leaving them abandoned and alone. The difference in Too Beautiful for You is an empathy and warmth rarely seen in Blier’s often cynical work. Gérard Depardieu is the successful car dealer ambushed by Cupid when plain-looking secretary Josiane Balasko clumps into the office. It seems to defy all reason, how this frumpy, dumpy woman with eyes that caress lures Depardieu from elegant wife Carole Bouquet, a woman so poised and perfect she’s…

Film:Jesus of Montreal

Jesus of Montreal

Denys Arcand

What happens to the people putting on a Passion Play? Someday Mel Gibson may tell us, but Denys Arcand’s Jesus of Montreal proposes an engaging possibility. In hip present-day Montreal, a group of actors stages the Passion in an outdoor, somewhat avant-garde style, led by the quietly charismatic and increasingly uncanny young man (Lothaire Bluteau, Black Robe) playing Christ. His identification with the role, and the way it bleeds into real life, gives director Denys Arcand plenty of opportunities for social comment—some of it spot-on, some of it a…

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