Annal: 1992 Saturn Award for Best Horror Film

Results of the Saturn Award in the year 1992.

Film:The Silence of the Lambs

The Silence of the Lambs

Jonathan Demme

Based on Thomas Harris’s novel, this terrifying film by Jonathan Demme really only contains a couple of genuinely shocking moments (one involving an autopsy, the other a prison break). The rest of the film is a splatter-free visual and psychological descent into the hell of madness, redeemed astonishingly by an unlikely connection between a monster and a haunted young woman. Anthony Hopkins is extraordinary as the cannibalistic psychiatrist Dr. Hannibal Lecter, virtually entombed in a subterranean prison for the criminally insane. At the behest of the FBI,…

Film:Body Parts

Body Parts

Eric Red

Body Parts is a bone-chilling tale about a medical experiment gone wrong. After a crime psychologist (Fahey) loses his arm and nearly his life in a grisly car accident, he undergoes a daring medical operation to have a donor arm grafted onto his body. But after the operation, the arm starts to take on a violent life of its own, striking out against Bill’s wife and children. Consumed by fears about his dangerous behavior, Bill is driven to learn about the donor’s identity—a horrifying discovery that delivers him into a world of unimaginable terror.

Film:Child's Play 3

Child's Play 3

Jack Bender

One of filmdom’s most notorious killers is back to wreak more mayhem as Chucky continues his quest to possess the body of a human child. Eight years after seemingly destroying the killer doll, Andy Barclay (Justin Whalin) turns 16 and is placed in a military school. Meanwhile, the greedy president of Play Pals Toy Company decides to resurrect the popular Good Guys doll line, confident that all the bad publicity is forgotten. As the assembly line recreates the first doll from a mass of melted plastic, the spirit of Chucky returns to renew his quest and seek revenge on Andy. Once again it’s up to Andy to stop the unrelenting killer in this fast-paced thriller.

Film:Children of the Night

Children of the Night

Tony Randel

A chilling horror film about a town stalked by a vampire! When a vampire is released from his long imprisonment in a crypt, the unsuspecting town becomes the target of his unearthly blood lust. One by one, the entire population becomes either vampire or helpless victim. Stars Karen Black (House of 1000 Corpses), Peter DeLuise (TV’s “21 Jump Street”) and Ami Dolenz (She’s Out of Control).

Film:Dolly Dearest

Dolly Dearest

Maria Lease

An American family moves to Mexico to fabricate dolls, but their toy factory happens to be next to a Satan grave and the toys come into possession of an old, malicious spirit.

Film:Misery (1990)

Misery

Rob Reiner

Based on the chilling bestseller by Stephen King, Misery was brought to the screen by director Rob Reiner as one of the most effective thrillers of the 1990s. From a brilliant adaptation by screenwriter William Goldman, Reiner turned King’s cautionary tale of fame and idolatry into a mainstream masterpiece of escalating suspense, translating King’s own experience with obsessive fans into a frightening tale of entrapment and psychotic behavior. Kathy Bates deservedly won an Academy Award for her performance as Annie Wilkes, an unbalanced devotee of romance…

Film:Night of the Living Dead

Night of the Living Dead

Tom Savini

It’s a new night for terror—and a new dawn in horror movie-making when special-effects genius Tom Savini (creator of the spectacularly gruesome make-up in Friday The 13th and Creepshow) brings modern technology to this colorful remake of George A. Romero’s 1968 cult classic. Seven strangers are trapped in an isolated farmhouse while cannibalistic zombies—awakened from death by the return of aradioactive space probe—wage a relentless attack, killing (and eating) everyone in their path. The classic for the 90s: graphic, gruesome and more terrifying than ever!

Film:Sleeping With the Enemy

Sleeping With the Enemy

Joseph Ruben

This 1991 thriller by Joseph Ruben (True Believer) works up to a point: Julia Roberts plays an abused wife who fakes her death and starts anew under a different identity in Iowa. Her psychopathic husband (Patrick Bergin) figures it out and stalks her and her new boyfriend (Kevin Anderson). The best part of the film is the moody isolation of Roberts’s life with Bergin. Ruben ingeniously stakes out the story by presenting what looks like an ideal life between the two—a nice house on the ocean, a seemingly healthy sex life, etc.—and then, whammo! Vital to the…

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