Annal: 1993 British Academy of Film and Television Arts Award for Best Film

Results of the British Academy of Film and Television Arts Award in the year 1993.

Film:Howards End

Howards End

James Ivory

Margaret and Helen Schlegel (Oscar® winner Emma Thompson and Helena Bonham Carter) are sisters from a well-educated European family: intelligent, free-spirited, cultured, and highly emancipated by the standards of the time. A series of events brings them into a relationship with the Wilcox family: healthy, conservative, conventional, and very English, headed by the prosperous Henry (Anthony Hopkins) and his priggish son, Charles (James Wilby). Both families also come into contact with Leonard Bast (Samuel West) and his wife, a couple near the lowest tier of the rigid class system. Leonard’s desire for cultural and intellectual status attracts the attention of Helen, who must come to terms with her unexpected feelings toward him. At the same time, Margaret must reconcile her independent spirit with her desire for companionship and a comfortable place in Edwardian society; her moral strength is eventually able to resolve the tangle of opposites. First published in 1910, E.M. Forster’s Howards End remains one of the most important English novels of the twentieth century, and Merchant Ivory Productions’ tour-de-force adaptation was one of the most critically acclaimed films of the 1990s.

Film:The Crying Game

The Crying Game

Neil Jordan

The Crying Game offers a rare and precious movie experience. The film is an unclassifiable original that surprises, intrigues, confounds, and delights you with its freshness, humor, and honesty from beginning to end. It starts as a psychological thriller, as IRA foot soldier Fergus (the incomparable Stephen Rea) kidnaps a British soldier (Forest Whitaker) and waits for the news that will determine whether he executes his victim or sets him free. As the night wears on, a peculiar bond begins to form between the two men. Later, the movie shifts tone and…

Film:The Player (1992)

The Player

Robert Altman

A wicked satirical fable about corporate backstabbing—and actual murder—in the movie business, The Player benefits from director Robert Altman’s long and bitter experience working within, and without, the Hollywood studio system. Rising young executive Griffin Mill (Tim Robbins) is tormented by threats from an anonymous writer. The pressure and paranoia build until Griffin loses control one night and semi-accidentally kills screenwriter David Kahane (Vincent D’Onofrio), who may or may not be the source of the threats. From that point, Griffin’s life and…

Film:Strictly Ballroom

Strictly Ballroom

Baz Luhrmann

While the plot of this Australian film may seem a bit familiar (The Ugly Duckling meets Dirty Dancing), the whimsical tone and superb dance sequences will make you forget the movie’s predictability. Scott (Paul Mercurio) is a champion ballroom dancer who wants to dance “his own steps.” Fran is the homely, beginning dancer who convinces Scott that he should dance his own steps…with her. Complicating matters are Scott’s domineering mother (Pat Thompson), a former dancer herself, who wants her son to win the Australian Pan Pacific Championship (the…

Film:Unforgiven

Unforgiven

Clint Eastwood

Winner of four Academy Awards, including best picture, director, supporting actor, and best editing, Clint Eastwood’s 1992 masterpiece stands as one of the greatest and most thematically compelling Westerns ever made. “The movie summarized everything I feel about the Western,” said Eastwood at the time of the film’s release. “The moral is the concern with gunplay.” To illustrate that theme, Eastwood stars as a retired, once-ruthless killer-turned-gentle-widower and hog farmer. He accepts one last bounty-hunter mission—to find the men who brutalized a…

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