Annal: 1995 Boston Globe-Horn Book Award for Nonfiction

Results of the Boston Globe-Horn Book Award in the year 1995.

Book:Abigail Adams

Abigail Adams: Witness to a Revolution

Natalie S. Bober

Abigail Adams is often referred to as the wife of one president and the mother of another. Rarely is she described as a woman in her own right. Although her primary focus and concerns were in her role as wife and mother, she lives in history because of her extraordinary letters to her family and to her friends.

She was a witness to the gathering storm of the Revolutionary War. She saw the Battle of Bunker Hill from a hilltop near her home, and soldiers marching past her door frequently stopped for a drink of water. Because she was so close to the scene, she was able to give firsthand reports of the American Revolution to her husband and other leaders creating a new government, as she wrote about the times and the people who played vital roles in the birth of our nation.

Mingling the intimate with the momentous, she documented what it was like to live at a time when education was not available…[more]

Book:The Great Fire (Jim Murphy)

The Great Fire

Jim Murphy

A vertible cinematic account of the catastrophe that decimated much of Chicago in 1871, forcing more than 100,000 people from their homes. Jim Murphy tells the story through the eyes of several survivors. These characters serve as dramatic focal points as the fire sweeps across the city, their stories illuminated by fascinating archival photos and maps outlining the spread of fire.

Book:It's Perfectly Normal

It's Perfectly Normal: Changing Bodies, Growing Up, Sex, and Sexual Health

Robie H. Harris, Michael Emberley

Providing accurate, lucid, unbiased answers top nearly every conceivable question children may have about sexuality, It’s Perfectly Normal is here to help. From conception and puberty to birth control and AIDS, it is a refreshingly open and thorough presentation of the facts of sex—both biological and psychological—which children need now more than ever. Throughout, two cartoon characters, a curious bird and a squeamish bee, reflect the diverse feelings children often have about sex. Packed with warm, age-appropriate illustations, often humorous but always scientifically correct, It’s Perfectly Normal offers children the resassurance that the changes and emotions they experience while growing up are perfectly normal.

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