Annal: 1995 Saturn Award for Best Fantasy Film

Results of the Saturn Award in the year 1995.

Film:Forrest Gump

Forrest Gump

Robert Zemeckis

The Academy Award winner for Best Picture, Best Director Robert Zemeckis, and Best Actor Tom Hanks, this unlikely story of a slow-witted but good-hearted man somehow at the center of the pivotal events of the 20th century is a funny and heartwarming epic. Hanks plays the title character, a shy Southern boy in love with his childhood best friend (Robin Wright) who finds that his ability to run fast takes him places. As an All-Star football player he meets John F. Kennedy; as a soldier in Vietnam he’s a war hero; and as a world champion Ping-Pong player he’s hailed…

Film:Angels in the Outfield

Angels in the Outfield

William Dear

This effects-heavy, 1994 remake of the 1951 film starring Janet Leigh and Keenan Wynn is all computer-generated pizzazz, with none of the charm or imagination of the original. Aimed squarely at children this time, the story focuses on a boy who gets some divine intervention on behalf of his favorite ball club. Christopher Lloyd plays the head angel, and Danny Glover is good as the team’s manager, but the real star of the film—for better or worse—is the software that makes a glowing, celestial presence on the field seem real. —Tom Keogh

Film:Ed Wood

Ed Wood

Tim Burton

Edward D. Wood Jr. was an actor writer-director-producer, occasionally in drag, who combined meager bursts of talent with an undying optimism to create some of the most bizarrely memorable “B” movies to ever come out of Tinseltown. Though Wood died in obscurity as an alcoholic in 1978, his films have been considered cult classics for years. He is consistently voted the worst director who ever lived. You would think this an odd subject, but director Tim Burton harnesses the undying hopefulness that made Wood such a character. Shot in black and white, just like…

Film:The Flintstones

The Flintstones

Brian Levant

This pleasant, lightweight live-action version of the popular cartoon is about as good as you might expect. The kids should love the broad humor and the Henson Studios creatures, but like The Addams Family movies, the look and the cast are the best things going for it. Considering that the nature of the material is so sparse, the thinly plotted story works better than other TV-to-movie fare. Our fabulous Stone Age man is promoted per a calculated move by a scheming exec (Kyle MacLachlan, whose casting ensured at least one cute guy). As a comedy, the humor…

Film:The Lion King

The Lion King

Rob Minkoff, Roger Allers

Not an ideal choice for younger kids, this hip and violent animated feature from Disney was nevertheless a huge smash in theaters and on video, and it continues to enjoy life in an acclaimed Broadway production. The story finds a lion cub, son of a king, sent into exile after his father is sabotaged by a rivalrous uncle. The little hero finds his way into the "circle of life" with some new friends and eventually comes back to reclaim his proper place. Characters are very strong, vocal performances by the likes of Jeremy Irons, Nathan Lane, and Whoopi Goldberg are terrific, the jokes are aimed as much (if not more) at adults than kids, the animation is sometimes breathtaking, and the music is more palatable than in many Disney features. But be cautious: this is too intense for the Rugrat crowd. --Tom Keogh

How good-looking is the DVD restoration of Disney's popular animated film? Take a look at the serviceable but dull film…[more]

Film:The Mask

The Mask

Chuck Russell

Sometimes it’s hard to tell if The Mask (or Jim Carrey’s in-your-face mugging in general) is actually funny, or just bizarre and grotesque. And sometimes it just doesn’t matter. Carrey plays a shy, Jerry Lewis-like nerd who discovers an ancient mask that magically transforms him into a green-faced, zoot-suited Tex Avery cartoon character with no inhibitions. As Roger Ebert said of Carrey in Ace Ventura: Pet Detective, the actor performs “as if he’s being clocked on an Energy-O-Meter, and paid by the calorie expended.” If that’s your kind of humor,…

Film:The Santa Clause

The Santa Clause

John Pasquin

Tim Allen makes an impressive screen debut in Disney’s well-written holiday film, The Santa Clause. Divorced toy company executive Scott Calvin is pleased to have his son Charlie for Christmas, though the boy himself isn’t happy about it. But when Santa Claus accidentally topples off the roof of the house and falls with a thud in the snow, Scott finds himself taking the merry old elf’s place and earning new respect in his son’s eyes. When the night ends, the reindeer take them to the North Pole, and Scott discovers that by donning the fabled red suit, he’s…

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