Annal: 1995 Saturn Award for Best Horror Film

Results of the Saturn Award in the year 1995.

Film:Interview with the Vampire

Interview with the Vampire

Neil Jordan

When it was announced that Tom Cruise would play the vampire Lestat in this adaptation of Anne Rice’s bestselling novel, even Rice chimed in with a highly publicized objection. The author wisely and justifiably recanted her negative opinion when she saw Cruise’s excellent performance, which perceptively addresses the pain and chronic melancholy that plagues anyone cursed with immortal bloodlust. Brad Pitt and Kirsten Dunst are equally good at maintaining the dark and brooding tone of Rice’s novel. And in this rare mainstream project for a major studio, director…

Film:Cronos

Cronos

Guillermo del Toro

Guillermo del Toro made an auspicious, audacious feature debut with Cronos, a highly unorthodox tale about the seductiveness of the idea of immortality. Kindly antiques dealer Jesús Gris (Federico Luppi) happens upon an ancient golden device in the shape of a scarab, and soon finds himself possessor and victim of its sinister, addictive powers, as well as the target of a mysterious, crude American named Angel (a delightfully deranged Ron Perlman). Featuring marvelous special makeup effects and the unforgettably haunting imagery for which del Toro has become world-renowned, Cronos is a visually rich and emotionally captivating dark fantasy.

Film:The Crow

The Crow

Alex Proyas

The Crow set the standard for dark and violent comic-book movies (like Spawn or director Alex Proyas’s superior follow-up, Dark City), but it will forever be remembered as the film during which star Brandon Lee (son of martial arts legend Bruce Lee) was accidentally killed on the set by a loaded gun. The filmmakers were able to digitally sample what they’d captured of Lee’s performance and piece together enough footage to make the movie releasable. Indeed, it is probably more fascinating for that post-production story than for the tale on the…

Film:Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

Kenneth Branagh

Let’s be honest: this should be titled Wretched Excess’ Frankenstein. Swooping, wild, bloody, and energetic, this is bad moviemaking from the best, which makes it all the more loveable. Kenneth Branagh plays Victor Frankenstein, a man so obsessed with conquering death that he decides to create life. What he gets, after a protoplasmic mud wrestle, is a Mean Streets monster (Robert De Niro) that isn’t particularly happy to be back from the dead or thrilled about all the stitches. Helena Bonham Carter may, at several points in this film, actually be…

Film:Mosquito

Mosquito

Gary Jones

Get the Deep-Woods Off! It’s a mosquito the size of a German shepherd, armed with a proboscis as big around as a carrot, which it jabs into various eye sockets, chests, thighs, and even butt-cheeks! When a UFO crashes into a swamp, swarms of these mutated, oversized bugs go out looking for victims. A hapless couple smacks one of the outsized insects (filled with what appears to be stewed tomatoes and cranberry sauce) with their car, disabling the auto and leaving them stranded. They soon hook up with a government scientist, run afoul of two half-wit militia…

Film:Wes Craven's New Nightmare

Wes Craven's New Nightmare

Wes Craven

English-professor-turned-horror-auteur Wes Craven brings both careers to play in this ingenious reinterpretation of the Nightmare on Elm Street series as a modern-day fairy tale—a sort of Hansel and Gretel for big kids. Heather Langenkamp, star of the original film, plays Heather Langenkamp, an actress and mother wracked with nightmares as Los Angeles is rocked with unexplained earthquakes. Meanwhile, her son starts sleepwalking and croaking Freddy Krueger threats. Is it a coincidence that Wes Craven (playing himself) is turning his own troubled…

Film:Wolf

Wolf

Mike Nichols

Sophisticated to a point, this well-executed wolf-man tale works due to its clever setting and enormous star power. We all know Jack Nicholson can go nuts, but the script makes his character aware of his changes, sometimes for the better, early on. The setting, a publishing house in the middle of a takeover, gives the characters dramatic life before the horror elements kicks in. A senior editor about to get the boot, Nicholson's character becomes a new man after being bitten by a wolf. He takes on challenges at work, lives a more robust life, and attracts a new…

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