Annal: 2000 Grammy Award for Best Rock Album

Results of the Grammy Award in the year 2000.

Album:There Is Nothing Left to Lose

There Is Nothing Left to Lose

Foo Fighters

Riding the momentum of the hit single “Learn to Fly,” which hit No. 1 on the modern-rock charts long before this album’s release, the Foo Fighters’ third record is unarguably its most refined and poppy. The ominous riff that the opens “Stacked Actors” (which sounds like something Kurt Cobain could have hacked out on Nirvana’s gnarly In Utero) is pretty much a red herring. The 10 tunes that follow are a succession of hook-laden pop songs tarted up with guitarist-vocalist (and former Nirvana drummer) Dave Grohl’s thick guitars and increasingly sugar-sweet…

Album:The Battle of Los Angeles

The Battle of Los Angeles

Rage Against the Machine

Having successfully fused music and politics from their start, inspiring both moshing and young minds in the process, Rage Against the Machine emerges in peak form with merely their third album in seven years. Guitarist Tom Morello is one of the most distinctive and innovative players of his era, and his foil, vocalist/lyricist Zack De La Rocha, is as unrelenting and inspiring as ever on The Battle of Los Angeles. Rage, whose past antics include performing naked with duct tape over their mouths to protest censorship, released Battle on Election Day,…

Album:Crush (Bon Jovi)

Crush

Bon Jovi

The growling, choppy guitar sample that opens the first track here, “It’s My Life”, is a virtual declaration of intent for the first Bon Jovi album in five years, a statement that they’re updating the sound without abandoning the traditional virtues that made them one of the biggest bands on the planet. So make way for a hi-tech parade of smooth-but-gutsy rock anthems, almost any one of which will gladden the heart of every AOR radio programmer in the land. Unless the world has changed irredeemably, cuts such as the mid-paced heartbreak chugger “Say It Isn’t So”…

Album:Mad Season

Mad Season

Matchbox Twenty

Sell 10 million copies of your debut album and you might find yourself putting on a few airs. Evidence that it’s happened to matchbox twenty can be found in the new, spelled-out format of their all-lowercased name and the pretentious insertion of that name into the title of this, their sophomore set. The level of popularity achieved by their 1996 debut, Yourself or Someone Like You, posed a more profound problem, though—should they follow in the footsteps of that smash effort, or strike out in a different direction? To their credit, the Orlando quintet…

Album:Return of Saturn

Return of Saturn

No Doubt

After No Doubt sold more than 10 million copies of Tragic Kingdom, riding that wave of success without toppling over must have been a daunting mission. No sweat for No Doubt. The band toiled as national unknowns with a loyal local following for a decade before that album’s release, and during that time the band members were learning how to be better songwriters and musicians. The follow-up, Return of Saturn, glides along that continuum of songcraft perfection. The band presents a cleaner, less apologist representation of their influences. They pull…

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