Annal: 2000 International Horror Guild Award for Nonfiction

Results of the International Horror Guild Award in the year 2000.

Book:At the Foot of the Story Tree

At the Foot of the Story Tree

Bill Sheehan

At the Foot of the Story Tree (a title which should be familiar to readers of Shadowland) is an old-fashioned work of criticism that takes a hard—and hopefully thorough—look at the entire body of Peter Straub’s fiction, from his relatively obscure mainstream novel, Marriages, through his ambitious new supernatural thriller, Mr. X, and from the shorter fiction collected in Houses Without Doors through such recent, still uncollected stories as the Stoker Award-winning “Mr. Clubb and Mr. Cuff.” Book by book, story by story, I have done my best to untangle the complexities of Straub’s fiction, to isolate and illuminate its central concerns, and to articulate my highly personal sense of its unique—and, I believe  enduring—value.

Whether or not I’ve achieved any of these objectives is not for me to say. Anyone who takes the time to read my book…[more]

Book:The Horror Reader

The Horror Reader

Ken Gelder

Spanning the history of horror in literature and film, from Edgar Allen Poe to The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, The Horror Reader brings together essential writings on this most spectacular and controversial of genres. It covers classic gothic literature like Frankenstein to lesbian vampire movies and new Asian horror. An introduction by Ken Gelder and a preface before each section prepares the reader for the next topic of discussion on this fascinating genre

Book:Horror of the 20th Century

Horror of the 20th Century: An Illustrated History

Robert Weinberg

As long as there have been storytellers, audiences have sought stories that make their flesh creep and their blood curdle. These are the tales that have been read furtively under covers or retold in whispers by the light of campfires. From Horace Walpole to Stephen King, the masters of horror have offered us such tales of the eerie and the spectral. Author Robert Weinberg has assembled the best of these phantasmal visions in Horror of the Twentieth Century. Here is a vivid recounting of the writers, illustrators, publishers, actors, and filmmakers who for more than two centuries satisfied the fluctuating tastes of their audiences. Every media from comics, paperbacks, hardcovers and movies is cataloged.

Book:Lord of a Visible World

Lord of a Visible World: An Autobiography in Letters

H.P. Lovecraft, S.T. Joshi, David E. Schultz

A prolific and fascinating letter writer, the renowned science fiction writer H.P. Lovecraft chronicled the most minute particulars of his life in his correspondence. Whether he is describing the antics of his favorite cats, evaluating baked beans or cheese, or debating the purchase of a suit, Lovecraft’s remarkable letters reveal much about him as a writer and as a man. They also outline his views on history, aesthetics, society, politics, and economics—among a myriad of subjects that engaged his wide-ranging intellect. This selection of Lovecraft letters and essays, some of which have never been published, bring to light much about the era, the circle in which he worked, and his candid and sometimes surprising reactions to the circumstances of his life.

Book:On Writing

On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft

Stephen King

“If you don’t have the time to read, you don’t have the time or the tools to write.”

In 1999, Stephen King began to write about his craft—and his life. By midyear, a widely reported accident jeopardized the survival of both. And in his months of recovery, the link between writing and living became more crucial than ever.

Rarely has a book on writing been so clear, so useful, and so revealing. On Writing begins with a mesmerizing account of King’s childhood and his uncannily early focus on writing to tell a story. A series of vivid memories from adolescence, college, and the struggling years that led up to his first novel, Carrie, will afford readers a fresh and often very funny perspective on the formation of a writer. King next turns to the basic tools of his trade—how to sharpen and multiply them through use, and how the writer must always have them close at hand. He takes the reader through crucial aspects of the writer’s art…[more]

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