Annal: 2001 Edgar Allan Poe Award® for Best Juvenile

Results of the Edgar Allan Poe Award® in the year 2001.

Book:Dovey Coe

Dovey Coe

Frances O'Roark Dowell

My name is Dovey Coe and I reckon it don’t matter if you like me or not. I’m here to lay the record straight, to let you know them folks saying I done a terrible thing are liars. I aim to prove it, too. I hated Parnell Caraway as much as the next person, but I didn’t kill him.

Dovey Coe says what’s on her mind, so it’s no secret that she can’t stand Parnell Caraway. Parnell may be the son of the richest man in town, but he’s mean and snobby, and Dovey can’t stand the fact that he’s courting her sister, Caroline, or the way he treats her brother, Amos, as if he were stupid just because he can’t hear.

So when Parnell turns up dead, and Dovey’s in the room where his body is discovered, she soon finds herself on trial for murder. Can the outspoken Dovey sit still and trust a city slicker lawyer who’s still wet behind the ears to get her out of the biggest mess of her life?

Book:Ghosts In The Gallery

Ghosts In The Gallery

Barbara Brooks Wallace

Why is there no one waiting to meet Jenny when the coach in which she is traveling stops on the deserted road to let her off? Before her mother died, did she not write Jenny’s grandfather telling him of her coming to live with him? Why, after the grim journey from far-off China, does she have to stumble in the darkness through a tunnel of menacing trees to her new home? Surely a grandfather longing to greet his granddaughter, newly orphaned, would never allow such a thing to happen.

But the real reason for Jenny’s predicament is far worse than anything she could have imagined. For not only has the letter never been received—no one believes a granddaughter exists at all! Only an appeal by the housekeeper earns for her the terrible choice of being sent back to China, or to the cellar to live as a servant girl.

Is Jenny really who she has been told she is? And who in that great, gloomy house cares? Fearful Madame Dupray? Hateful…[more]

Book:Sammy Keyes and the Curse of Moustache Mary

Sammy Keyes and the Curse of Moustache Mary

Wendelin Van Draanen

The normally unflappable Sammy Keyes is reeling—not from her encounters with a corpse, an arsonist, or an irate policeman, these she can handle. No, what completely unbalances her is the teen-scene at a New Year’s Eve party. Caught up in this adolescent ambush, Sammy begins to doubt herself. And if she can’t trust her own instincts, how can she possibly figure out who burned down a pioneer-era cabin, how a 200-pound pig has disappeared , or why Casey might want to hold her hand?

In this fifth Sammy Keyes mystery, Wendelin Van Draanen gives us her most ambitious work to date. While her prose is as comic as ever, there’s a very serious undercurrent here—Sammy is tossed and torn, both literally and figuratively, as she shoots the rapids of this plot. But in puzzling out whodunit and how and why, she manages not only to turn the culprits over to the police, but also to reclaim a belief in her own strength.

Book:Trouble at Fort Lapointe

Trouble at Fort Lapointe

Kathleen Ernst

Suzette Choudoir has spent each of her twelve summers at La Pointe Island on Lake Superior, where Ojibwe people camp by the French fur-trade fort. It is 1732 and if her papa wins the trappers’ competition, the prize will let him stay with his Ojibwe family year-round instead of wintering in far-off Montréal with the other French voyageurs. But a troublemaker sabotages the competition, and Papa. Only someone who’s both Ojibwe and French can figure out what’s going on—someone like Suzette.

Book:Walking To The Bus Rider Blues

Walking To The Bus Rider Blues

Harriette Gillem Robinet

It is June, 1956 in Montgomery, Alabama.

African-Americans are boycotting the bus company that had their neighbor, Mrs. Rosa Parks, arrested for refusing to give up her seat to a white man. Until they can sit wherever they wish on the bus, African-Americans are refusing to ride. They are walking.

For Alfa Merryfield, walking can be a problem. When he takes the bus he avoids the white boys who steal his pay for working in Mr. Greendale’s grocery store. Losing the money is a disaster. He and his sister and his great-grandmother, who live together, need money to rent their two-room house. When Alfa loses his pay, they are short on the rent. To make matters worse, someone is stealing the money they save from where they hide it, and they, themselves, are accused of stealing two thousand dollars from…[more]

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