Annal: 2001 Grammy Award for Best Alternative Music Album

Results of the Grammy Award in the year 2001.

Album:Parachutes

Parachutes

Coldplay

Music doesn’t come more touching than Parachutes. With their debut single alone, the emotion-fortified “Shiver”, Coldplay proved they could shift between elated and crushed in a breath as singer Chris Martin poured out music’s oldest chestnut (unconditional yet unrequited love) with the shakiest of voices and a backdrop of epic guitars that rouse and tug at the heart strings. For 10 tracks on Parachutes, he comes out with these, adding new-found meaning to the most tired and overused rock sentiments—love found, love lost, love unrequited, hurting…

Album:Amnesiac

Amnesiac

Radiohead

More song-driven and acoustic than Kid A, Radiohead’s Amnesiac isn’t quite “Kid B,” but it is unquestionably cut from the same far-out cloth, as the band revels in fascinating quirks and abject nihilism. It’s also the first time in Radiohead’s career that a new record hasn’t meant a complete shift in artistic priorities. Surely, however, regardless of which was released first, they both deserve recognition; after all, Amnesiac, like Kid A, is an amazing piece of work.

Only lightly augmented with electronics, songs like “You and…

Album:Halfway Between the Gutter and the Stars

Halfway Between the Gutter and the Stars

Fatboy Slim

British techno wizard and crossover superstar Norman Cook’s (a.k.a. Fatboy Slim) Halfway Between the Gutter and the Stars is uneven as heck and nowhere near as frat boy-friendly as his previous releases. But if you’re up for a ride, this eclectic, 68-minute roller-coaster trip contains tunes airier and more house-savvy and gospel-flavored than what you’ve heard from him before. Not needing to create another “Rockafeller Skank” has left Cook free to experiment. There are lovely, slowly building tunes: “Talking ‘bout My Baby” sounds like a collaboration…

Album:Strange Little Girls

Strange Little Girls

Tori Amos

Tori Amos’s idea for Strange Little Girls was to present covers of men’s songs from a female perspective. The concept is fairly unique—although Liz Phair had a similar idea with 1993’s Exile in Guyville. But while Phair fashioned original lyrics in response to the Rolling Stones’ Exile on Main Street, Amos sticks with the script when reciting lyrics from acts as diverse as the Velvet Underground, Depeche Mode, Neil Young, Tom Waits, and Slayer. She transforms the material, though, by singing in a pained tone, weighing the lyrics with heavy…

Album:Vespertine

Vespertine

Björk

Björk originally intended to call Vespertine Domestika. The title would have been entirely appropriate (as, indeed, is Vespertine, meaning “pertaining to the evening”). Ever since 1993’s vital, effusive Debut, Björk’s music has been increasingly intimate, gently private and concerned with seclusion. It’s typical then that Vespertine’s first single was called “Hidden Place”. The studious solitude is rewarding, though. Vespertine is a lush, gorgeous swell of mid-pace electronica, symphonic strings and Björk’s uniquely alien,…

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