Annal: 2001 Grammy Award for Best Rock Album

Results of the Grammy Award in the year 2001.

Album:All That You Can't Leave Behind

All That You Can't Leave Behind

U2

The foursome come roaring out of the blocks with their latest collection. The album's first single, "Beautiful Day," raced to the No. 1 slot on the U.K. singles charts and received a similar rapturous reception stateside. From its shimmering preamble to its sweeping, infectious chorus, it perfectly stakes out the middle ground between the anthemic U2 of the '80s and the more grounded group of the '90s. With Daniel Lanois and Brian Eno sharing production chores again after having taken a break with Pop, the U2 team enters the new millennium with their lineup--and mission--intact. --Steven Stolder

Album:Gold

Gold

Ryan Adams

Torrential creativity has fast-forwarded the artistic evolution of former Whiskeytown frontman Ryan Adams from country-rock boy wonder (see Faithless Street) to despondent troubadour with a 1960s fixation (his solo debut Heartbreaker), but it may also explain why listeners often need to wade through some pedestrian material just to find a few pearls of poetic excellence. Gold is no exception to that trend, a sometimes engaging middle-of-the-road roots-pop album that’s both overlong (70 minutes) and at times overindulgent. There are high…

Album:Hybrid Theory

Hybrid Theory

Linkin Park

It may be too cynical to assume Hybrid Theory changed its name to Linkin Park in order to appear right next to Limp Bizkit in your local record bin. But rock-rap workouts like “One Step Closer” and “Papercut” do make Linkin Park a comfortable fit with Fred Durst and his ilk. Producer Don Gilmore (Pearl Jam, Lit, Eve 6) and twin vocal threats Chester Bennington and Mike Shinoda serve up industrial-strength rap and rock melodicism with equal aplomb on this woulda-been-self-titled debut effort. “Points of Authority” aims to sound like Trent Reznor wanking it up with…

Album:Just Push Play

Just Push Play

Aerosmith

It’s difficult to separate Aerosmith from their glorious/inglorious history—one that’s seen more revivals than West Side Story. For better or worse, the stalwart Boston quintet carry a load of preconceptions that are impossible to shake. Thus Just Push Play begs the question: If this 12-song set was the product of a bunch of upstarts, would it cause much of a commotion? The answer: Absolutely! Working with coproducers and song collaborators Marti Frederiksen and Mark Hudson, Aerosmith have forged an album that gracefully fuses ‘70s hard-rock grit…

Album:Stories From The City, Stories From The Sea

Stories From The City, Stories From The Sea

P.J. Harvey

Stories from the City, Stories from the Sea—the sixth album from the most incendiary female British performer to emerge in the 1990s—is as powerful a record as any Polly Jean Harvey has made. Masterfully striking a balance between her blues-folk roots, avant-leanings, and soaring pop sensibility, it serves as a summary of Harvey’s prior achievements. The abrasive, jagged guitars hark back to her fiery 1992 debut album, Dry, on the ballistic yet anthemic opener, “Big Exit,” while the dreamy, opulent closer, “We Float,” demonstrates her maturity as a…

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