Annal: 2002 Edgar Allan Poe Award® for Best Critical/Biographical Work

Results of the Edgar Allan Poe Award® in the year 2002.

Book:Edgar Allan Poe A to Z

Edgar Allan Poe A to Z: The Essential Reference to His Life and Work

Dawn B. Sova

Few authors can claim Edgar Allan Poe’s influence on literary and popular culture. During his short and turbulent life, he became a pioneer of the detective and horror genres with his immortal tales and poems. Best known for the haunting melody of his poetry and prose, his classic tales include “The Raven,” “The Fall of the House of Usher,” “The Tell-Tale Heart,” “The Murders in the Rue Morgue,” “The Cask of Amontillado,” and “The Pit and the Pendulum.” Poe also wrote numerous critical articles and reviews, essays, and magazine articles on a wide variety of subjects. This comprehensive guide contains more than 2,000 entries covering all aspects of his life and work, including: relationships with friends, relatives, and associates; synopses of his tales, poems, and critical works; descriptions of his characters, from C. Auguste Dupin to Montresor; film and musical adaptations of his works; and places that influenced Poe, from Baltimore to New York City.

Book:Dashiell Hammett: A Daughter Remembers

Dashiell Hammett: A Daughter Remembers

Josephine Hammett, Richard Laymon, Julie M. Rivett

For more than forty years, since the day her illustrious father died, Jo Hammett has kept her silence. Now, for the first time, with uncompromising candor and profound admiration, she tells the story of Dashiell Hammett—Hollywood screenwriter and high-flying author of The Maltese Falcon and The Thin Man—as she knew him. In Jo Hammett’s earliest recollections, although her already famous father exists outside the sphere of the daily life she shares with her mother and sister, he writes to Jo frequently and visits when he can. Jo’s memories of him are golden: She recalls a trip to the Santa Anita racetrack in a chauffeur-driven limousine, where Hammett plays more on the horses than he can afford; she recalls a Depression-era excursion to Beverly Hills and a splurge that would have supported an entire family for a month—on a riding outfit. With more ambivalence, she remembers the 1950s, when she assumes her responsibility as the sole designated correspondent with her blacklisted, imprisoned father and her…[more]

Book:The History of Mystery

The History of Mystery

Max Allan Collins

Footprints, a smoking revolver, broken glass . . . Whodunit? Get to the bottom of things with Max Allan Collins, who puts the enigmatic, endlessly fascinating world of the mystery genre under the magnifying glass in The History of Mystery. Starting with Edgar Allan Poe’s fictional detective Dupin, Collins tracks the modern detective story from its birth in Allan Pinkerton’s Memoirs to its fullest flowering in the fiction of Dashiell Hammett, Raymond Chandler, and Ross MacDonald. Collins widens his scope to explore the rich narrative and visual history of detective comics and the legacy of mystery in radio, television, and film noir. This stunning volume presents a magical selection of pulp and dime-novel covers of the thirties and forties, gats-and-gals paperback covers of the fifties and sixties, the Sunday strips’ yellow-trenchcoat-clad Dick Tracy, and portraits of the terribly proper and totally astute television dynamos Hercule Poirot, Miss Marple, and Jessica Fletcher. En route, Collins reveals…[more]

Book:My Name's Friday

My Name's Friday: The Unauthorized but True Story of Dragnet and the Films of Jack Webb

Michael J. Hayde

Jack Webb’s Dragnet was more than the crisp, campy color television series that played from 1966 to 1970. First there was the successful radio series of 1949 to 1957 and then the black-and-white television series of 1951 to 1959, which became the best-known, longest-running, and most-acclaimed police drama in television history. My Name’s Friday tells the true stories of all these versions of Dragnet and its creator, director, star, and producer, Jack Webb, as the show and the man defined each other.

From the beginning Webb had an idea of what Dragnet should be, and My Name’s Friday chronicles the many ways in which he developed and refined his ideas as the show matured from radio to television. Webb emphasized realism, basing his scripts on cases from the Los Angeles Police Department and enlisting law enforcement professionals as advisors for the show. …[more]

Book:Selected Letters of Dashiell Hammett: 1921-1960

Selected Letters of Dashiell Hammett: 1921-1960

Julie M. Rivett, Richard Laymon, Josephine Hammett Marshall, Dashiell Hammett

A literary event: The first-ever selection from the letters of Dashiell Hammett, the genius of American crime fiction.

More than any book before it, this one gives us the complete Hammett, in his own words. Here is Hammett the family man, distant but devoted, sometimes late with the check but never too late; Hammett the student of politics, scanning the headlines from a Marxist perspective; Hammett the lover of Lillian Hellman, delighting in her style, humor, accomplishments but maintaining his independence. Celebrity, soldier, activist, survivor—Hammett was each in turn, but he was always, above all else, a writer. The artist is present in every line, and this book adds to his stature as a classic American writer.

Book:Who Was That Lady? Craig Rice: The Queen of Screwball Mystery

Who Was That Lady? Craig Rice: The Queen of Screwball Mystery

Jeffrey Marks

Craig Rice, the author of fourteen novels, countless short stories, and a number of true crime pieces, once rivaled Agatha Christie in sales. She was on the cover of Time Magazine in 1946. However, the past fifty years have seen her fall into relative obscurity. Rice made for an interesting subject for a biography because nearly every identification point about the author was in dispute: her birth, her real name, her number of marriages, number of children, her canon of fiction, and the cause of her early death. Marks had to wade through years of research to come up with the answers to those questions. Following a trail that went from Venice, Italy to Venice Beach, CA, he talked to a number of her contemporaries, her family, and friends to come up with an engaging book that reminds readers why Rice remains the undisputed queen of the comedic mystery.

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