Annal: 2004 Grammy Award for Album of the Year

Results of the Grammy Award in the year 2004.

Album:Genius Loves Company

Genius Loves Company

Ray Charles

The fact that Genius Loves Company will be Ray Charles’s final new album inspires an unavoidable blue feeling. But it’s also a happy reminder that the man spent the last months of his life at work doing what he loved. The overall effect of these dozen duets is autumnal and smooth. Brother Ray is on point and cruising here. Fine moments abound—you can hear his delight even in the rather stiff company of Diana Krall and Natalie Cole. His voice sounds a bit frayed by ill health at times, but it also allows for great performances like the slyness behind the…

Album:American Idiot

American Idiot

Green Day

For its first new set of music since 2000’s Warning, Green Day tears up the blueprint and comes up with something unexpected: a punk rock concept album built around elaborate melodies, odd tempo changes, and a collection of songs that freely reference classic rock warhorses like the Beatles and Pink Floyd. “She’s a Rebel” and “St. Jimmy” might sound like vintage Green Day, but the rest of the disc finds the Northern California trio trying on a variety of different guises: “Boulevard of Broken Dreams” is a cliché-strewn Foo Fighters-style power ballad;…

Album:The College Dropout

The College Dropout

Kanye West

This debut from the most sought-after hip-hop producer not named Pharrell delivers the unthinkable: West magically sledgehammers home his opinions on taboo topics over beats that are equally daring. The envelope-ripping beats shouldn’t come as a surprise given that he’s supplied the soundscapes to monster singles by everyone from Alicia Keys (“You Don’t Know My Name”) to Talib Kweli (“Get By”). What is freakish is that in West’s world, rhymes about strippers, God, college life, and guns can co-exist tidily and not undermine each other. On “Breathe In Breathe Out”…

Album:Confessions

Confessions

Usher

A CD is always more compelling when you know it’s lifted from the artist’s autobiography, and that’s certainly the case with Confession, Usher’s first record since 2001’s 8701. The Atlanta singer’s string of hits over the past decade have been decidedly PG-13 rated, almost veering towards teen pop, but he’s changed all that on this co-produced offering, which he claims is “the real him.” It would be too simplistic to just brand this record a break-up record, chronicling his public split with TLC’s Rozonda “Chili” Thomas; it is that, but so much…

Album:The Diary of Alicia Keys

The Diary of Alicia Keys

Alicia Keys

Alicia Keys has more than lived up to the promise of her formidable debut Songs in A Minor, pushing beyond her flirtation with old-school soul and venturing into the modern world, even hiring Timbaland to guide her through the shoals of anthemic hip-hop on the breathless and funkified “Heartburn.” Sounding like a hyperthyroid cheerleader, Keys unleashes a quirky sense of humor that no one even suspected she possessed. Her effortless singing on the beat-driven “Karma” is a wonder of sonics on this uplifting piece of pop philosophy, giving countless anxious…

Views: 1,363 • Modified: • Elapsed: 0.038 sec