Annal: 2005 Grammy Award for Best Rock Album

Results of the Grammy Award in the year 2005.

Album:How to Dismantle an Atomic Bomb

How to Dismantle an Atomic Bomb

U2

The album that carries U2 into its 25th year—and likely the mixed blessings of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame—is one of its most frank and focused since the days of October and War. But its gestation was anything but simple, in part salvaged from ‘03 sessions the band deemed subpar. Enter Steve Lillywhite, the band’s original producer and sometime collaborator in the decades since, who helped retool the track “Native Son” (originally an antigun screed) into the aggressive iPod anthem “Vertigo” and leaves his distinctive stamp on the muscular “All…

Album:A Bigger Bang

A Bigger Bang

The Rolling Stones

It should come as no surprise that it took sex, disease and death to shake the Rolling Stones out of their latest creative dry spell. Leading up to the making of A Bigger Bang, produced by Don Was, Mick Jagger endured a very public break-up with Jerry Hall, Charlie Watts battled throat cancer, and Ron Wood was devastated by the news of his ex-wife’s suicide. Out of their collective struggles, the members of the venerable British rock band managed to piece together some of their best work in nearly two decades. It’s a slick, slightly uneven affair bounding…

Album:In Your Honor

In Your Honor

Foo Fighters

It’s likely that a decade after its debut record this band now has fans who might ask, “You mean Dave Grohl was in a band before the Foo Fighters?” But they, or any Foo followers who pine for the increasingly refined vocals and polished pop-punk uniformity of the first four albums, will swallow this one whole—or at least half. For as much as vocalist/bandleader Grohl and Co. mix a similar concoction on the 20-song double CD, they manage to agitate the formula ever so slightly. Disc one follows the Foo’s classic sonic blueprint: lip-smacking melodies and enigmatic…

Album:Prairie Wind

Prairie Wind

Neil Young

An artist for all musical seasons, Neil Young returns to autumnal harvest mode on Prairie Wind, with homespun material and sing-song melodies that renew the spirit of some of his most popular releases. Yet the mood here is darker in its maturity than on Harvest and Harvest Moon—the previous releases in what now sounds like a trilogy—and the arrangements have greater range and aural depth, with Wayne Jackson of the soulful Memphis Horns, the Fisk University Jubilee Singers gospel choir, and a string section employed to striking effect. This is…

Album:X&Y

X&Y

Coldplay

Things have gone ridiculously well for Coldplay since 2002’s A Rush of Blood to the Head. The group’s global album sales have soared past the 10-million mark, putting it in the same stratosphere as megabands U2 and the Dave Matthews Band. People have offered up their bank accounts, cars, and even bodies for tickets to its shows. And, in a interesting twist, frontman Chris Martin married Gwyneth Paltrow and set the tabloid world aflame. Funny thing, then, that the British quartet’s much-anticipated third album, X&Y, is all about staying grounded. In…

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