Annal: 2005 Orbis Pictus Award

Results of the Orbis Pictus Award in the year 2005.

Book:York's Adventures with Lewis and Clark

York's Adventures with Lewis and Clark: An African-American's Part in the Great Expedition

Rhoda Blumberg

Did you know that an African-American man participated in Lewis and Clark’s famous expedition? Working alongside free men, Clark’s slave York played an important role in the journey’s success.

This award-winning book draws on extensive research to give a gripping and insightful account of York’s significant contribution to this landmark historical event.

Book:Actual Size

Actual Size

Steve Jenkins

How big is a crocodile? What about a tiger, or the world’s largest spider? Can you imagine a tongue that is two feet long or an eye that’s bigger than your head? Sometimes facts and figures don’t tell the whole story. Sometimes you need to see things for yourself ”at their actual size.

Book:The Race to Save the Lord God Bird

The Race to Save the Lord God Bird

Phillip Hoose

The tragedy of extinction is explained through the dramatic story of a legendary bird, the Ivory-billed Woodpecker, and of those who tried to possess it, paint it, shoot it, sell it, and, in a last-ditch effort, save it. A powerful saga that sweeps through two hundred years of history, it introduces artists like John James Audubon, bird collectors like William Brewster, and finally a new breed of scientist in Cornell’s Arthur A. “Doc” Allen and his young ornithology student, James Tanner, whose quest to save the Ivory-bill culminates in one of the first great conservation showdowns in U.S. history, an early round in what is now a worldwide effort to save species. As hope for the Ivory-bill fades in the United States, the bird is last spotted in Cuba in 1987, and Cuban scientists join in the race to save it.

All this, plus Mr. Hoose’s wonderful story-telling skills, comes together to give us what David Allen Sibley, author of The Sibley Guide to Birds calls “the most thorough and readable account to date of the personalities, fashions, economics, and politics that combined to bring about the demise of the Ivory-billed Woodpecker.”

Book:Secrets of the Sphinx

Secrets of the Sphinx

James Cross Giblin

The Great Sphinx is one of the largest sculptures in the world. Six stories high and a city block wide, it has stood guard over the pyramids of Egypt’s Giza Plateau for 4,500 years. Who built the Sphinx and why? And how did primitive sculptors manage to carve such a towering monument?

In search of answers, James Cross Giblin takes readers back to a time before written history and traces the trail of clues left behind by the ancient Egyptians. As he explores various theories, Giblin seamlessly incorporates fascinating information on the pyramids, the Rosetta Stone, Atlantis, and more.

Book:Seurat and La Grande Jatte

Seurat and La Grande Jatte: Connecting the Dots

Robert Burleigh

A Sunday on la Grande Jatte-1884 continues to fascinate art lovers over a century since Georges Seurat painted and first displayed it - so much so that it alone will form the basis of an entire exhibit at the world-famous Art Institute of Chicago. Award-winning author Robert Burleigh uses this extraordinary painting to give young children a compelling look at Seurat’s life and introduce them to the post-impressionist art technique Seurat invented - pointillism, in which a picture is constructed from dots of pure color that blend at a distance into recognizable shapes and various color tones.

Part biography, part art appreciation, Seurat and La Grande Jatte tells the story behind the story depicted on the canvas of a busy park on a Sunday afternoon in 1884, and encourages children to discover their own methods of self-expression.

Book:The Voice That Challenged a Nation

The Voice That Challenged a Nation: Marian Anderson and the Struggle for Equal Rights

Russell Freedman

“A voice like yours,” celebrated conductor Arturo Toscanini told contralto Marian Anderson, “is heard once in a hundred years.” This insightful account of the great African American vocalist considers her life and musical career in the context of the history of civil rights in this country. Drawing on Anderson’s own writings and other contemporary accounts, Russell Freedman shows readers a singer pursuing her art despite the social constraints that limited the careers of black performers in the 1920s and 1930s. Though not a crusader or a spokesperson by nature, Marian Anderson came to stand for all black artists-and for all Americans of color-when, with the help of such prominent figures as Eleanor Roosevelt, she gave her landmark 1939 performance on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, which signaled the end of segregation in the arts. Carefully researched, expertly told, and profusely illustrated with contemporary photographs, here is a moving account of the life of a talented and determined artist who left her mark on musical and social history. Through her story, one of today’s leading authors of nonfiction for young readers illuminates the social and political climate of the day and an important chapter in American history.

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