Annal: 2006 Orbis Pictus Award

Results of the Orbis Pictus Award in the year 2006.

Book:Children of the Great Depression

Children of the Great Depression

Russell Freedman

As he did for frontier children in his enormously popular Children of the Wild West, Russell Freedman illuminates the lives of the American children affected by the economic and social changes of the Great Depression. Middle-class urban youth, migrant farm laborers, boxcar kids, children whose families found themselves struggling for survival…all Depression-era young people faced challenges like unemployed and demoralized parents, inadequate food and shelter, schools they couldn’t attend because they had to go to work, schools that simply closed their doors. Even so, life had its bright spots — like favorite games and radio shows — and many young people remained upbeat and optimistic about the future.

Drawing on memoirs, diaries, letters, and other firsthand accounts, and richly illustrated with classic archival photographs, this book by one of the most celebrated authors of nonfiction for children places the Great Depression in context and shows young readers its human face. Endnotes, selected bibliography, index.

Book:ER Vets

ER Vets: Life in an Animal Emergency Room

Donna Jackson

They can surgically remove an arrow in a cat’s abdomen, repair a bird’s broken wing, even save a tiny foal that is in a coma. How? With high-tech x-rays, endoscopes, and electrocardiographs — but most important, with a love of science and animals. Twenty-four hours a day, with a team of anesthesiologists, cardiologists, ophthalmologists, nurses, internists, residents, and a healthy dose of adrenaline, emergency room veterinarians try to heal these little — and large — creatures we consider part of our families.

Filled with full-color behind-the-scenes photographs, this book captures the drama, excitement, and courage of being an ER vet.

Book:The Forbidden Schoolhouse

The Forbidden Schoolhouse: The True and Dramatic Story of Prudence Crandall and Her Students

Suzanne Jurmain

They threw rocks and rotten eggs at the school windows. Villagers refused to sell Miss Crandall groceries or let her students attend the town church. Mysteriously, her schoolhouse was set on fire - by whom and how remains a mystery. The town authorities dragged her to jail and put her on trial for breaking the law.

Her crime? Trying to teach African American girls geography, history, reading, philosophy, and chemistry. Trying to open and maintain one of the first African American schools in America.

Exciting and eye-opening, this account of the heroine of Canterbury, Connecticut, and her elegant white schoolhouse at the center of town will give readers a glimpse of what it is like to try to change the world when few agree with you.

Book:Genius: A Photobiography of Albert Einstein

Genius: A Photobiography of Albert Einstein

Marfe Ferguson Delano

In 1905 Einstein published three important papers describing ideas that changed science forever and eventually had an effect on much of modern life. The most famous of these ideas was his theory of relativity, which took a startling new approach to space and time.

In signature National Geographic photobiography format, author Marfe Feguson Delano covers the life and times of Einstein from his childhood to his death, with a particular emphasis on his scientific contributions. She draws connections between Einstein’s ideas and modern technology, so that kids can see how his theories led to technologies they take for granted. She discusses Einstein’s theory on the structure of light, in which he theorized that light behaved not only like a wave but also like a stream of particles, providing the basis for television, lasers, and semiconductors. Einstein’s theory of relativity paved the way…[more]

Book:Hitler Youth

Hitler Youth: Growing Up in Hitler's Shadow

Susan Campbell Bartoletti

“I begin with the young. We older ones are used up…But my magnificent youngsters! Look at these men and boys! What material! With them, I can create a new world.” —Adolf Hitler, Nuremberg 1933

By the time Hitler became Chancellor of Germany in 1933, 3.5 million children belonged to the Hitler Youth. It would become the largest youth group in history.

Susan Campbell Bartoletti explores how Hitler gained the loyalty, trust, and passion of so many of Germany’s young people. Her research includes telling interviews with surviving Hitler Youth members.

Book:Mosquito Bite

Mosquito Bite

Alexandra Siy, Dennis Kunkel

On a summer night a boy plays outside with his friends and is the target of a female Culex pipiens mosquito.

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