Annal: 2007 Pulitzer Prize for History

Results of the Pulitzer Prize in the year 2007.

Book:The Race Beat

The Race Beat: The Press, the Civil Rights Struggle, and the Awakening of a Nation

Gene Roberts, Hank Klibanoff

This is the story of how America awakened to its race problem, of how a nation that longed for unity after World War II came instead to see, hear, and learn about the shocking indignities and injustices of racial segregation in the South—and the brutality used to enforce it.

It is the story of how the nation’s press, after decades of ignoring the problem, came to recognize the importance of the civil rights struggle and turn it into the most significant domestic news event of the twentieth century.

Drawing on private correspondence, notes from secret meetings, unpublished articles, and interviews, veteran journalists Gene Roberts and Hank Klibanoff go behind the headlines and datelines to show how a dedicated cadre of newsmen—first black reporters, then liberal southern editors, then reporters and photographers from the national press and the broadcast media—revealed…[more]

Book:Mayflower: A Story of Courage, Community, and War

Mayflower: A Story of Courage, Community, and War

Nathaniel Philbrick

From the bestselling author of In the Heart of the Sea—winner of the National Book Award—the startling story of the Plymouth Colony.

From the perilous ocean crossing to the shared bounty of the first Thanksgiving, the Pilgrim settlement of New England has become enshrined as our most sacred national myth. Yet, as bestselling author Nathaniel Philbrick reveals in his spellbinding new book, the true story of the Pilgrims is much more than the well-known tale of piety and sacrifice; it is a fifty-five-year epic that is at once tragic, heroic, exhilarating, and profound.

The Mayflower’s religious refugees arrived in Plymouth Harbor during a period of crisis for Native Americans as disease spread by European fishermen devastated their populations. Initially the two groups—the Wampanoags, under the charismatic…[more]

Book:Middle Passages

Middle Passages: African American Journeys to Africa, 1787-2005

James T. Campbell

Many works of history deal with the journeys of blacks in bondage from Africa to the United States along the “middle passage,” but there is also a rich and little examined history of African Americans traveling in the opposite direction. In Middle Passages, award-winning historian James T. Campbell vividly recounts more than two centuries of African American journeys to Africa, including the experiences of such extraordinary figures as Langston Hughes, W.E.B. DuBois, Richard Wright, Malcolm X, and Maya Angelou. A truly groundbreaking work, Middle Passages offers a unique perspective on African Americans’ ever-evolving relationship with their ancestral homeland, as well as their complex, often painful relationship with the United States.

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