Annal: 2011 Guardian Children's Fiction Prize

Results of the Guardian Children's Fiction Prize in the year 2011.

Book:Return to Ribblestrop

Return to Ribblestrop

Andy Mulligan

It’s a new term at Ribblestrop and the headmaster is hoping for a bit more organisation. But secrets remain under the ground, the new Chaplain is not all that he seems, and a truck load of circus animals has taken refuge in the school grounds. Amongst the new intake are a footballing protegee and a trainee psychopath…not to mention a pregnant panther and an escaped crocodile. Things are about to go from bad to worse at Ribblestrop…can Millie, Sanchez and the gang help save the day once more?

Book:Moon Pie (Simon Mason)

Moon Pie

Simon Mason

Someone has to keep their head, as Mum used to say, and 11-year-old Martha is used to being that someone in her family. Her little brother, Tug, is too small. Her dad has been acting too strange. And Mum’s not here anymore.

So when Dad falls off the roof, it’s Martha who ices his knee and takes him to the doctor. And when Dad doesn’t come home, it’s Martha who cooks Tug’s favorite pie and reads him his bedtime story. And when Dad passes out, it’s Martha who cleans him up and keeps his secret.

But eventually Dad’s problems become too big for even Martha to solve, and she realizes it’s not all up to her—there are people and places she can turn to.

Book:My Name Is Mina

My Name Is Mina

David Almond

Mina loves the night. While everyone else is in a deep slumber, she gazes out the window, witness to the moon’s silvery light. In the stillness, she can even hear her own heart beating. This is when Mina feels that anything is possible and her imagination is set free.

A blank notebook lies on the table. It has been there for what seems like forever. Mina has proclaimed in the past that she will use it as a journal, and one night, at last, she begins to do just that. As she writes, Mina makes discoveries both trivial and profound about herself and her world, her thoughts and her dreams.

Award-winning author David Almond reintroduces readers to the perceptive, sensitive Mina before the events of Skellig in this lyrical and fantastical work. My Name is Mina is not only a pleasure to read, it is an intimate and enlightening look at a character whose open mind and heart have much to teach us about life, love, and the mysteries that surround us.

Book:Twilight Robbery

Twilight Robbery

Frances Hardinge

Mosca Mye and Eponymous Clent are in trouble again. Escaping disaster by the skin of their teeth, they find refuge in Toll, the strange gateway town where visitors may neither enter nor leave without paying a price. By day, the city is well-mannered and orderly; by night, it’s the haunt of rogues and villains. Wherever there’s a plot, there’s sure to be treachery, and wherever there’s treachery, there’s sure to be trouble—and where there’s trouble, Clent, Mosca and the web-footed apocalypse Saracen can’t be far behind. But as past deeds catch up with them and old enemies appear, it looks as if this time there’s no way out…

Book:Momentum (Saci Lloyd)

Momentum

Saci Lloyd

London, the near future. Energy wars are flaring across the globe—oil prices have gone crazy, regular power cuts are a daily occurrence. The cruel Kossak soldiers prowl the streets, keeping the Outsiders—the poor, the disenfranchised—in check. Hunter is a Citizen: one of the privileged of society, but with his passion for free running and his rebel friend Leo he cannot help but be fascinated by the Outsiders. So when he meets Outsider Uma, he is quickly drawn into their world—and into an electrifying and dangerous race to protect everything they hold dear.

Book:Mr Gum and the Secret Hideout

Mr Gum and the Secret Hideout: Book 8 of series

Andy Stanton, David Tazzyman

Follow Polly and Friday on another crazy adventure on the streets of Lamonic Bibber. And watch out for that dastardly villain, Mr Gum, not to mention his sidekick, Billy William. But what could that fiend be up to this time? Could there be 8 ladies all called Pamela? Will Friday O’Leary have to wrestle a man-eating Octopus? Who knows? Either way, it’ll be barking bonkers. But don’t believe us, believe them…

Book:My Sister Lives on the Mantelpiece

My Sister Lives on the Mantelpiece

Annabel Pitcher

Ten-year-old Jamie Matthews has just moved to the Lake District with his Dad and his teenage sister, Jasmine for a ‘Fresh New Start’. Five years ago his sister’s twin, Rose, was blown up by a terrorist bomb. His parents are wrecked by their grief, Jasmine turns to piercing, pink hair and stops eating. The family falls apart. But Jamie hasn’t cried in all that time. To him Rose is just a distant memory. Jamie is far more interested in his cat, Roger, his birthday Spiderman T-shirt, and in keeping his new friend Sunya a secret from his dad. And in his deep longing and unshakeable belief that his Mum will come back to the family she walked out on months ago.

When he sees a TV advert for a talent show, he feels certain that this will change everything and bring them all back together once and for all.

Book:Small Change for Stuart

Small Change for Stuart

Lissa Evans

Stuart Horten—ten years old and small for his age—moves to the dreary town of Beeton, far away from all his friends. And then he meets his new next-door neighbours, the unbearable Kingley triplets, and things get even worse. But in Beeton begins the strangest adventure of Stuart’s life as he is swept up in quest to find his great-uncle’s lost workshop—a workshop stuffed with trickery and magic. There are clues to follow and puzzles to solve, but what starts as fun ends up as danger, and Stuart begins to realize that he can’t finish the task by himself…

The first children’s novel by Lissa Evans, this is a fast-moving blend of comedy and magic.

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