Artist: Eminem

Information about the artist.

Works

Album:The Eminem Show

The Eminem Show

Eminem

Any lingering doubts as to the depth of Eminem’s skills or his potential for raw yet compelling honesty are dispelled on The Eminem Show’s first track. Armed with a quicksilver flow and a thundering rhythm track (the record was exec produced by longtime mentor and partner Dr. Dre), “White America” finds Eminem ferociously mauling the hand that feeds him, lambasting his critics, the industry, and the racism that, in many ways, helped make Marshall Mathers more than just another rapper. “Let’s do the math,” Em sneers, “If I was black I would have sold half/…

Album:The Marshall Mathers LP

The Marshall Mathers LP

Eminem

Will the real Slim Shady please stand up? On Eminem’s sophomore album, he can’t decide who he wants to be: the deranged pseudo-psycho of the Slim Shady LP, or a nice guy who just likes to rhyme about slicing and dicing his girlfriend (“Kim”). Of course, according to Eminem, he’s just kidding. He refuses to take responsibility for the misogynistic, homophobic bile he spews, whining that he’s the victim of people who don’t get his unique sense of humor. It’s good old America’s fault if the kids aren’t alright (Eminem blames bad parenting), and he’s just…

Album:Encore

Encore

Eminem

Eminem’s fourth album offers few surprises, but still enough pleasures to carry the day. As evinced by Em’s pre-election, pro-voting “Mosh,” this is not exactly the same Eminem who seemingly crapped on anything and everything. Encore finds a surprisingly mature Eminem waxing reflective about his battle with Benzino (“Like Toy Soldiers”) rather than unloading both barrels. However, it’s not all elder statesmanship: “Puke” goes after his ex-wife Kim with incredible scorn, and “Big Weenie” brings the familiar juvenile humor that made him famous. If…

Album:8 Mile: Music from and Inspired by the Motion Picture

8 Mile: Music from and Inspired by the Motion Picture

Eminem, Various Artists

How Eminem was able to assemble so many credible emcees of today and yesteryear (Jay-Z, Rakim) to endorse his Holly’hood coming out party is anyone’s guess. What is clear, however, is that (dare we say it) the Shady One might be growing up. On “Lose Yourself” Em abandons his callous, hardcore posturing to write thoughtful hood-centric coming-of-age lyrics that would make Melle Mel proud. On “Battle,” Gang Starr’s Guru tears through a sick beat from rap’s most prolific producer, DJ Premier. Sadly, Nas wastes more valuable studio time dissing Jay-Z (ho hum) on “You…

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