Author: Albert Marrin

Information about the author.

Works

Book:Flesh & Blood So Cheap

Flesh & Blood So Cheap: The Triangle Fire and Its Legacy

Albert Marrin

On March 25, 1911, the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory in New York City burst into flames.  The factory was crowded.  The doors were locked to ensure workers stay inside.  One hundred forty-six people—mostly women—perished; it was one of the most lethal workplace fires in American history until September 11, 2001.

But the story of the fire is not the story of one accidental moment in time.  It is a story of immigration and hard work to make it in a new country, as Italians and Jews and others traveled to America to find a better life.  It is the story of poor working conditions and greedy bosses, as garment workers discovered the endless sacrifices required to make ends meet.  It is the story of unimaginable, but avoidable, disaster.  And it the story of the unquenchable pride and activism of fearless immigrants and women who stood up to business, got America on their side, and finally changed working conditions for our entire nation, initiating…[more]

Book:Sitting Bull and His World

Sitting Bull and His World

Albert Marrin

Richly researched, told with sweep, speed, and balance, here is a biography of the man who was arguably the Plains Indians’ most revered, most visionary leader. Tatan’ka Iyota’ke—Sitting Bull—was the great Hunkpapa Lakota chief who helped defeat Custer at the Battle of the Little Bighorn. But more than that, he was a profound holy man and seer, an astute judge of men, a singer and speaker for his people’s ways. In the face of the army, the railroad, the discovery of gold, and the decimation of the buffalo, he led his band to Canada rather than “come in” to the white man’s reservation. To render Sitting Bull in context, the author explores the differences in white and Indian cultures in the nineteenth century and shows the forces at work—economic pressure, racism, technology, post-Civil War politics in Washington and in the army—that led to the creation of a continental nation at the expense of a whole people.

Book:Unconditional Surrender

Unconditional Surrender: U.S. Grant and the Civil War

Albert Marrin

When the small, stoop-shouldered man in a rumpled uniform and scuffed boots, accompanied by a thirteen-year-old boy, asked for a room at Willard’s Hotel in Washington, D.C., he was offered a small room on the top floor. But when the clerk saw the man’s signature, suddenly a suite was found for him. The man was Ulysses S. Grant, and President Lincoln recently had appointed him commander in chief of the Union forces.

Noted historian Albert Marrin tells how this reluctant soldier became the leader who was able to bring final victory to the Union after years of bloody, wrenching civil war. Along the way he describes how soldiers lived in army camps: their food, their recreation, their thoughts, taken from diaries and letters home, and brings to the reader the experience of war: the fear, the deadly mistakes, the early medical services to the wounded, and always the heroism. Dr. Marrin re-creates the battles of Grant’s campaigns and puts them in historical perspective. He makes it clear to his readers why both Abraham Lincoln and the ordinary Yankee soldier were willing to trust the outcome of the war and the future of the country to this unlikely hero.

Views: 767 • Modified: • Elapsed: 0.017 sec