Author: Deborah Hopkinson

Information about the author.

Works

Book:Apples to Oregon

Apples to Oregon: Being the (Slightly) True Narrative of How a Brave Pioneer Father Brought Apples, Peaches, Pears, Plums, Grapes, and Cherries (and Children) Across the Plains

Deborah Hopkinson, Nancy Carpenter

Apples, ho!

When Papa decides to pull up roots and move from Iowa to Oregon, he can’t bear to leave his precious apple trees behind. Or his peaches, plums, grapes, cherries, and pears. Oh, and he takes his family along too. But the trail is cruel — first there’s a river to cross that’s wider than Texas… and then there are hailstones as big as plums… and there’s even a drought, sure to crisp the cherries. Those poor pippins! Luckily Delicious (the nonedible apple of Daddy’s eye) is strong — as young ’uns raised on apples are — and won’t let anything stop her father’s darling saps from tasting the sweet Oregon soil.

Here’s a hilarious tall tale — from the team that brought you Fannie in the Kitchen — that’s loosely based on the life of a real fruiting pioneer.

Book:A Band of Angels

A Band of Angels: A Story Inspired By The Jubilee Singers

Deborah Hopkinson, Raúl Colón

A Band of Angels is fiction, but it is based on real events and people. The character of Ella was inspired by Ella Sheppard Moore, who was born February 4, 1851, in Nashville, Tennessee. Her father was able to free himself and young Ella from slavery, but before he could buy freedom for Ella’s mother she was sold away. Ella was raised in Cincinnati, where she took music lessons. At fifteen, she was left penniless when her father died. She arrived at Fisk School in 1868 with only six dollars.

Fisk was opened in 1866 as a school for former slaves and began offering college classes in 1871. That year, in a desperate attempt to save Fisk from closing, a music teacher named George White set out with a group of students on a singing tour to raise money. Although at first they only sang popular music of the day, they soon became famous for introducing spirituals to the world. …[more]

Book:Titanic: Voices from the Disaster

Titanic: Voices from the Disaster

Deborah Hopkinson

Critically acclaimed nonfiction author Deborah Hopkinson pieces together the story of the Titanic and that fateful April night, drawing on the voices of survivors and archival photographs.

Scheduled to coincide with the 100th anniversary of the tragic sinking of the Titanic, a topic that continues to haunt and thrill readers to this day, this book by critically acclaimed author Deborah Hopkinson weaves together the voices and stories of real Titanic survivors and witnesses to the disaster—from the stewardess Violet Jessop to Captain Arthur Rostron of the Carpathia, who came to the rescue of the sinking ship. Packed with heartstopping action, devastating drama, fascinating historical details, loads of archival photographs on almost every page, and quotes from primary sources, this gripping story, which follows the Titanic and its passengers from the ship’s celebrated launch at Belfast to her cataclysmic icy end, is sure to thrill and move readers.

Book:Sky Boys

Sky Boys: How They Built the Empire State Building

Deborah Hopkinson, James E. Ransome

The acclaimed team that brought readers the IRA Children’s Book Award-winning Sweet Clara and the Freedom Quilt is back with a riveting brick-by-brick account of how one of the most amazing accomplishments in American architecture came to be.

It’s 1930 and times are tough for Pop and his son. But look! On the corner of 34th Street and 5th Avenue, a building straight and simple as a pencil is being built in record time. Hundreds of men are leveling, shoveling, hauling. They’re hoisting 60,000 tons of steal, stacking 10 million bricks, eating lunch in the clouds. And when they cut ribbon and the crowds rush in, the boy and his father will be among the first to zoom up to the top of the tallest building in the world and see all of Manhattan spread at their feet.

Book:Shutting Out the Sky

Shutting Out the Sky: Life in the Tenements of New York, 1880-1924

Deborah Hopkinson

Acclaimed author Hopkinson recounts the lives of five immigrants to New York’s Lower East Side through oral histories and engaging narrative. We hear Romanian-born Marcus Ravage’s disappointment when his aunt pushes him outside to peddle chocolates on the street. And about the pickle cart lady who stored her pickles in a rat-infested basement. We read Rose Cohen’s terrifying account of living through the Triangle Shirtwaist fire, and of Pauline Newman’s struggles to learn English. But through it all, each one of these kids keeps working, keeps hoping, to achieve their own American dream.

Book:Bluebird Summer

Bluebird Summer

Deborah Hopkinson, Bethanne Andersen

For Mags and Cody, summer has always meant long golden days with Gramps and Grandma at the farm on the ridge, where the wheat fields stretch to the horizon and bluebirds sing from the old wood fence.

But now Grandma has died and Gramps is selling off his fields one by one, and the bluebirds—no longer at home in Grandma’s abandoned garden of tangled weeds—are gone. How can Mags and Cody bring them back, bring everything back?

This rich picture book, —the collaboration of a master storyteller and an immensely gifted artist—, offers readers of all ages hope, comfort, and the renewal that can come with great patience and love.

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