Author: Keith Gray

British writer.

Works

Book:Ostrich Boys

Ostrich Boys

Keith Gray

“It’s not really kidnapping, is it? He’d have to be alive for it to be proper kidnapping.”

Kenny, Sim and Blake are about to embark on a remarkable journey of friendship. Stealing the urn containing the ashes of their best friend Ross, they set out from Cleethorpes on the east coast to travel the 261 miles to the tiny hamlet of Ross in Dumfries and Galloway. After a depressing and dispriting funeral they feel taking Ross to Ross will be a fitting memorial for a 15 year-old boy who changed all their lives through his friendship. Little do they realise just how much Ross can still affect life for them even though he’s now dead.

This is Keith Gray’s first new novel in three years and is a wonderful rites-of-passage story combing elements from Stand By Me, An Inspector Calls and Grand Theft Parsons.

Book:Warehouse

Warehouse

Keith Gray

'I know a place you can go'. It's a secret place hidden among the run down buildings of the derelict dockyards. A community of young people who have gathered in an old warehouse to get away from a world they don't fit in to. Through separate but interweaving narratives, Warehouse tells the stories of three of the community's members.

There's Robbie who is running away from his violent older brother, Frank, and needs some space to realise that the beatings are not his fault. Amy, who's supposed to be travelling in Europe but has had her rucksack stolen and is too proud to ask her smothering family for help. And then there's Lem, an ex-drug-addict and founder of the Warehouse community, whose perceived role as leader by the other young people is too much for him to cope with.

A gripping story about a community of runaways.

Book:Malarkey

Malarkey

Keith Gray

Brook High is a great grey concrete ants' nest of a school. John Malarkey is the new kid, thrown in at the deep end of Year 11. He's the wrong person in the wrong place at the wrong time. Through what at first appears to be a random meeting, he helps a girl called Mary Chase out of tricky situation, but is subsequently accused of stealing report cards to sell to students so they can write their own bogus reports. He quickly realises it was all a set-up, and that he's been used to take the fall. The teacher who accuses him of the crime gives him one day to prove his innocence.

Malarkey tries to track down Mary Chase, but it's difficult in such a huge school. He does, however, discover strange goings-on beneath the surface of the school. There's the fixed football matches, with threats of violence to the team's star player. There's the homework club where money changes hands. There are teachers willing to take bribes. The more questions he asks, the…[more]

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