Author: Ramsey Campbell

Information about the author. See also www.ramseycampbell.com

Works

Book:Ramsey Campbell, Probably

Ramsey Campbell, Probably: On Horror and Sundry Fantasies

Ramsey Campbell

Ramsey Campbell, Probably collects 140,000 words of Campbell’s non-fiction from the last three decades.

The subjects range from the perils of authorship to the delights of amateur fiction and film, from drugs to nightmares, from the Highgate Vampire to the Dracula Society’s marching song. Friends are remembered, and so is Mary Whitehouse. A seminal study of English schoolgirl spanking on video is brought up to date. Many thoughts on the history of horror fiction are included. At last it is revealed why Harlan Ellison is responsible.

May the reader variously laugh, weep, ponder, disagree and turn uneasily in bed.

Book:Alone with the Horrors

Alone with the Horrors: The Great Short Fiction of Ramsey Campbell, 1961--1991

Ramsey Campbell

Ramsey Campbell is perhaps the world’s most decorated author of horror fiction. He has won four World Fantasy Awards, ten British Fantasy Awards, three Bram Stoker Awards, and the Horror Writers’ Association’s Lifetime Achievement Award.

Three decades into his career, Campbell paused to review his body of short fiction and selected the stories that were, to his mind, the very best of his works. Alone With the Horrors collects nearly forty tales from the first thirty years of Campbell’s writing. Included here are “In the Bag,” which won the British Fantasy Award, and two World Fantasy Award-winning stories, “The Chimney” and the classic “Mackintosh Willy.”

Campbell crowns the book with a length preface which traces his early publication history, discusses his youthful correspondence with August Derleth, illuminates the influence of H.P. Lovecraft on his early work, and gives an account of the creation…[more]

Book:Told by the Dead

Told by the Dead

Ramsey Campbell

Told by the Dead is Ramsey Campbell’s first short story collection for five years.

Spectral terrors abound, and monsters who might live next door or in our own heads. We learn why we should never play cards with strangers, and the perils of attending press shows of films. We glimpse a book that may render all others redundant, and encounter another that is too full of ghosts. A roadside mirror contains more than a reflection, and a bedroom mirror shows what may be in store for us all. Telephone advertising gives rise to a nightmare, and so does a Mediterranean holiday. A nostalgic train journey ends in dread, but leaving a train leads there too. Two street musicians may make the reader anxious to placate such entertainers with at least a coin. The author’s wife exerts a calming influence in a collaboration, but his delirium is irrepressible, and readers with recherché preferences will be rewarded by a troupe of rampant midgets. …[more]

Book:Silent Children

Silent Children

Ramsey Campbell

Once upon a time there was a man who loved children. He loved them so much he tried to save them from their imperfect parents. Unfortunately, Hector Woollie didn’t work for Child Protective Services . . . and the children he rescued, he murdered.

Once upon a time, Leslie had a happy marriage, a happy son, and a happy life. Now divorced, she is trapped in ongoing battles with her ex-husband, Roger, especially over their newly-adolescent son, Ian.

When Ian and his young stepsister disappear, Roger insists the boy kidnapped the girl, while Leslie thinks Ian might have run away. She prays that her son is near and will come home soon.

Ian is near-right next door, just on the other side of a shared wall. Ian can hear his parents fighting and his mother’s desperate weeping, but he can’t call for help. Hector Woollie has him and his stepsister, and if either child makes a peep, the madman will slit both their throats.

Book:The Overnight

The Overnight

Ramsey Campbell

A bookstore can be a wonderful, welcoming place of both commerce and curiosity. That’s the goal for Woody, an American recently transferred to England to run a branch of Texts. He wants a clean, orderly store and lots of sales to show his bosses when they arrive from the States for a pre-Christmas inspection. Not easy given the shop’s location in a foggy strip mall.

And things keep going wrong. No matter how often the shelves are put in order before the doors are locked at night, when the staff returns in the morning, books are lying all over the floor, many damp and damaged beyond repair. The store’s computers keep acting up-errors appear in brochures and ads and orders disappear completely. And even when the machines are turned off, they seem to glow with a spectral gray light.

The hit-and-run death of an employee in the store’s parking lot marks a turning point. One employee accuses another…[more]

Book:Nazareth Hill

Nazareth Hill

Ramsey Campbell

Oswald Priestley was widowed ten years ago, when his daughter was just a child. He’s done his best to raise her and give her proper values. But now she’s a teenager, convinced she knows everything about life and that her father knows nothing. She’s moody and sullen. She talks back. Her grades are dropping. And to make matters worse, she’s taken up with a boy from the wrong side of the tracks.

Amy Priestley is a normal teenager. Her boyfriend may be lower class, but he’s kind and intelligent. Amy doesn’t remember her mother. She does remember that as a child she was afraid of Nazareth Hill, the abandoned asylum that looms over the town. Now Nazareth Hill has been made into apartments, and she and her father have moved in. Their neighbors are a little eccentric at first, and as time passes, their odd quirks become less amusing and more dangerous. Amy is convinced that something in the building’s…[more]

Book:The Grin of the Dark

The Grin of the Dark

Ramsey Campbell

A former professor offers film critic Simon the chance of a lifetime—to write a book on one of the greatest long-lost comedians of the silent-film era, Tubby Thackeray. Simon is determined to find out the truth behind the jolly fat man’s disappearance from film—and from the world.

Tubby’s work carries the unmistakable stamp of the macabre. People literally laughed themselves to death during his performances. Soon, wherever Simon goes, laughter—and a clown’s wide, threatening grin—follow. Is Simon losing his mind? Or is Tubby Thackeray waiting for him to open the door back to the world?

Ramsey Campbell has won a dozen British Fantasy and World Fantasy Awards and three Bram Stoker Awards. A new Campbell novel is an opportunity to delight in the craftsmanship of an extraordinary writer.

Book:The Darkest Part of the Woods

The Darkest Part of the Woods

Ramsey Campbell

In The Darkest Part of the Woods, Campbell introduces readers to the Price family, whose lives have for decades been snarled with the fate of the ancient forest of Goodmanswood. Here, Dr. Lennox Price discovered a hallucinogenic moss that quickly became the focus of a cult-and though the moss and the trees on which it grew are long gone, it seems as if the whole forest can now affect the minds of visitors.

After Lennox is killed trying to return to his beloved wood, his widow seems to see and hear him in the trees-or is it a dark version of the Green Man that caresses her with leafy hands? Lennox’s grandson heeds a call to lie in his lover’s arms in the very heart of the forest-and cannot help but wonder what the fruit of that love will be.

And Heather, Lennox’s daughter, who turned her back on her father’s mysteries and sought sanctuary in the world of facts and history? Goodmanswood summons her as well…

Book:The Nameless

The Nameless

Ramsey Campbell

Book:The Doll Who Ate His Mother

The Doll Who Ate His Mother

Ramsey Campbell

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