Director: Robert Altman

Information about the director.

Works

Film:The Player (1992)

The Player

Robert Altman

A wicked satirical fable about corporate backstabbing—and actual murder—in the movie business, The Player benefits from director Robert Altman’s long and bitter experience working within, and without, the Hollywood studio system. Rising young executive Griffin Mill (Tim Robbins) is tormented by threats from an anonymous writer. The pressure and paranoia build until Griffin loses control one night and semi-accidentally kills screenwriter David Kahane (Vincent D’Onofrio), who may or may not be the source of the threats. From that point, Griffin’s life and…

Film:Gosford Park

Gosford Park

Robert Altman

Gosford Park finds director Robert Altman in sumptuously fine form indeed. From the opening shots, as the camera peers through the trees at an opulent English country estate, Altman exploits the 1930s period setting and whodunit formula of the film expertly. Aristocrats gather together for a weekend shooting party with their dutiful servants in tow, and the upstairs/downstairs division of the classes is perfectly tailored to Altman’s method (as employed in Nashville and Short Cuts) of overlapping bits of dialogue and numerous subplots in…

Film:Cookie's Fortune

Cookie's Fortune

Robert Altman

Dedicated fans of Robert Altman will want to check out this drowsy Southern comedy, which is shot through with the director’s feel for location and his musical sense of storytelling. Non-Altman fanatics might want to tread more carefully. Cookie’s Fortune begins beautifully, as handyman Willis (Charles S. Dutton) staggers home from a blues club in the small town of Holly Springs, Mississippi. In the wee hours of a warm night, he has an affectionate chat with elderly matriarch Jewel Mae “Cookie” Orcutt (the grand Patricia Neal) and the gentle history of…

Film:Ready to Wear

Ready to Wear

Robert Altman

Robert Altman’s much-anticipated broadside at the world of fashion is a disappointment. The film’s crazy-quilt Nashville-like narrative structure and ensemble casting (Julia Roberts, Tim Robbins, Lauren Bacall, Marcello Mastroianni, Sophia Loren) are a thing to behold, but the story’s many interlocking pieces lack overall depth and resonating emotion. There is a grand, satiric statement about fashion and society at the end of the film, and there are hints of an aging, nostalgic filmmaker’s skepticism about our postmodern world of short-lived attachments…

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