Film: 127 Hours

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Film:

127 Hours

Director: Danny Boyle
Honors:
Genres:
Distributor: Fox Searchlight Pictures

127 Hours is the true story of mountain climber Aron Ralston’s remarkable adventure to save himself after a fallen boulder crashes on his arm and traps him in an isolated canyon in Utah. Over the next five days Ralston examines his life and survives the elements to finally discover he has the courage and the wherewithal to extricate himself by any means necessary, scale a 65 foot wall and hike over eight miles before he is finally rescued. Throughout his journey, Ralston recalls friends, lovers, family, and the two hikers he met before his accident. Will they be the last two people he ever had the chance to meet?

Reviews

Amazon.com

Aron Ralston (played by James Franco) is traipsing alone through Utah’s Canyonlands National Park, minding his own sweet-natured, loosey-goosey business, when an errant step drops him into a crevasse. That in itself wouldn’t be so bad if he hadn’t managed to get his right hand stuck between a heavy boulder and the side of the cavern—a cavern that will be his grave, if he doesn’t figure out how to get himself out. Danny Boyle’s film of this real-life 2003 incident builds up to what we all know is going to happen: Ralston must sever his arm between his elbow and wrist, after a few long, lonely days of avoiding the idea. (Superb casual line delivery by Franco: “So I found this great tourniquet….”) Because this is a film by the director of Slumdog Millionaire and Trainspotting, we can expect a barrage of visual high jinks, despite the fact that this story would seem to be a simple tale of a man stuck in the desert. Boyle deploys flashbacks and fantasies to fill up the screen, plus he gets some mileage out of Ralston’s video camera—and, of course, this director can’t resist juicing the soundtrack with pop tunes, from Sigur Rós to Edith Piaf to Slumdog composer A.R. Rahman. Maybe Boyle is simply hyperactive, or maybe he’s really onto something about what would happen inside the mind of a man left in extremis for an extended period (who wouldn’t have a few Boyle-esque hallucinations, under the circumstances?). The cumulative effect is overbearing, but Franco’s performance is spirited and endearing—he makes Ralston sufficiently “of life” that you definitely don’t want to see this goofball soul be lost. —Robert Horton

Related Works

Album:127 Hours: Music from the Motion Picture

127 Hours: Music from the Motion Picture

A.R. Rahman

Original soundtrack to the 2010 film from director Danny Boyle includes a collaboration with composer A.R. Rahman and Dido. The atmospheric and transcendent music score of Academy Award-winning composer A.R. Rahman is at the heart and soul of the inspiring new 127 Hours, the true story of Aron Ralston, a trapped mountain climber and his ordeal in the Utah wilderness.

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