Film: Adventures of Pinocchio

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Film:

Adventures of Pinocchio

Director: Steve Barron
Honors:
Genres:
Distributor: New Line Home Video

Apparently aimed at very small children and the simple-minded, adults may decide that the best aspect of this kiddie flick is the clamshell box with its dual image “Magic Action Art.” Though strong technically, the blend of digital effects, animation, mattes, and miniatures is eventually too much of a hodgepodge. The plot is a confusing jumble of classic fairy-tale elements and jarring contemporary accents, attitudes, and lowbrow humor. The only real performers are Martin Landau, who is very classy as Geppetto, and a sad-looking Geneviéve Bujold. Syrupy…

Reviews

Amazon.com

Apparently aimed at very small children and the simple-minded, adults may decide that the best aspect of this kiddie flick is the clamshell box with its dual image “Magic Action Art.” Though strong technically, the blend of digital effects, animation, mattes, and miniatures is eventually too much of a hodgepodge. The plot is a confusing jumble of classic fairy-tale elements and jarring contemporary accents, attitudes, and lowbrow humor. The only real performers are Martin Landau, who is very classy as Geppetto, and a sad-looking Geneviéve Bujold. Syrupy child-star Jonathan Taylor Thomas makes you long to toss another puppet on the fire. However, the story basically follows Carlo Collodi’s fairy tale and the music is enjoyable, especially the songs by Stevie Wonder. This should maintain the interest of youngsters age 8 and under. —Rochelle O’Gorman

Barnes and Noble

A much different, nonmusical take on Carlo Collodi’s story than the familiar Disney Pinocchio, Francis Ford Coppola’s live-action adaptation merits a no-strings-attached recommendation. Oscar-winner Martin Landau stars as the lonely puppet maker Gepetto, who learns that “miracles are made in the heart” when his latest creation, a little wooden boy, comes to life. Jonathan Taylor Thomas supplies the voice of Pinocchio, whose curiosity leads him on a series of comical and exciting misadventures, such as his nose growing an eye-popping 16 feet after a fib one day. This movie also answers the question: What happens when Pinocchio sneezes? After he unwittingly makes a shambles of a bakery, he is placed in the custody of the evil Lorenzini, who wants to exploit Pinocchio in his grand puppet show. Pinocchio is a state-of-the-art animatronic marvel brought to life by Jim Henson’s Creature Shop. Among the gallery of memorable characters are the petty thief Felinet (Bebe Neuwirth) and her dim-witted sidekick Volpe (Rob Schneider), plus Pepe the Cricket, voiced by the original Bosley on TV’s Charlie’s Angels, David Doyle. Donald Liebenson

Related Works

Book:The Adventures of Pinocchio

The Adventures of Pinocchio

Carlo Collodi

Like many little boys, Pinocchio likes to dabble in mischief, disobey his parents, and shirk his studies and chores. Like many ordinary boys, Pinocchio does what he pleases, with scant regard for the consequences. But the star of this tale isn’t just any little boy. And he’s certainly not ordinary. In fact, he’s not a boy at all. With a head made of wood and his body carved from an enchanted tree limb, Pinocchio is a puppet. And a naughty one at that!

Author Carlo Collodi and illustrator Roberto Innocenti treat readers to a wildly imaginative ride in this delightful story of an egoistic wooden puppet whose bad behavior leads him from one misfortune to another. In the end, lured by the promise of becoming a “real” boy should he change his wicked ways, Pinocchio tries to make amends. But will his good deeds come too late?

Carlo Collodi is the pseudonym of Carlo Lorenzini (1826–1890), an accomplished Italian journalist whose…[more]

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