Film: Brotherhood of the Wolf

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Film:

Brotherhood of the Wolf

Director: Christophe Gans
Honors:
Genres:
Distributor: Universal Studios

If you crave an over-the-top historical kung fu-fantasy epic with a good dose of voluptuous nudity, bravura machismo, and passions so intense they verge on ridiculous, then Brotherhood of the Wolf is your movie. Based (loosely) on an 18th-century legend, this French film follows a hunky scientist (Samuel Le Bihan, who’s sort of a second-string Christopher Lambert) and his Iroquois sidekick/spiritual partner (Mark Dacascos) as they pursue a monstrous wolf ravaging the French countryside. Along the way Le Bihan gets entwined with a beautiful noblewoman…

Reviews

Amazon.com

If you crave an over-the-top historical kung fu-fantasy epic with a good dose of voluptuous nudity, bravura machismo, and passions so intense they verge on ridiculous, then Brotherhood of the Wolf is your movie. Based (loosely) on an 18th-century legend, this French film follows a hunky scientist (Samuel Le Bihan, who’s sort of a second-string Christopher Lambert) and his Iroquois sidekick/spiritual partner (Mark Dacascos) as they pursue a monstrous wolf ravaging the French countryside. Along the way Le Bihan gets entwined with a beautiful noblewoman (Émilie Dequenne) and a gorgeous prostitute (Monica Belluci) with secrets. The plot grows more and more incomprehensible, but the mix of torrid emotions, outrageous action sequences, and lurid titillation is really what the movie is about. Ignore the highbrow philosophizing and confused political intrigue; just enjoy the sensual images. —Bret Fetzer

Barnes and Noble

Take the dread and gore of a horror flick, add the flash and fury of Hong Kong action, dress it up in 18th-century French costumes, and the result is Brotherhood of the Wolf, a wildly original action film with a wicked bite. The story concerns a legend about a werewolf-like beast feeding on French countrymen and the crack team of specialists—a naturalist (Samuel Le Bihan) and his kung fu-kicking Native American companion, (Marc Dacascos)—who are ordered to find the elusive monster and end the bloodshed. As if the wolf weren’t enough trouble, an alluring prostitute (Monica Bellucci) may prove to be involved, as may be a count’s scary son (Vincent Cassel), who frowns upon his sister’s (Emilie Dequenne) affair with our lone-ranger naturalist. Brotherhood easily rises above its genre siblings Blade and Resident Evil, not so much for its melodramatic story and bone-crunching action as for its genre-bending style and unrepentant flair. Like Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon before it, the film takes aim at some old Hollywood myths: that good action flicks require major explosions, that good foreign-language films are all obscure, and that good costume dramas are all dull. Indeed, Brotherhood of the Wolf disproves all three. Tony Nigro

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