Film: Interview with the Vampire

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Film:

Interview with the Vampire

Director: Neil Jordan
Honors:
Genres:
Distributor: Warner Home Video

When it was announced that Tom Cruise would play the vampire Lestat in this adaptation of Anne Rice’s bestselling novel, even Rice chimed in with a highly publicized objection. The author wisely and justifiably recanted her negative opinion when she saw Cruise’s excellent performance, which perceptively addresses the pain and chronic melancholy that plagues anyone cursed with immortal bloodlust. Brad Pitt and Kirsten Dunst are equally good at maintaining the dark and brooding tone of Rice’s novel. And in this rare mainstream project for a major studio, director…

Reviews

Amazon.com

When it was announced that Tom Cruise would play the vampire Lestat in this adaptation of Anne Rice’s bestselling novel, even Rice chimed in with a highly publicized objection. The author wisely and justifiably recanted her negative opinion when she saw Cruise’s excellent performance, which perceptively addresses the pain and chronic melancholy that plagues anyone cursed with immortal bloodlust. Brad Pitt and Kirsten Dunst are equally good at maintaining the dark and brooding tone of Rice’s novel. And in this rare mainstream project for a major studio, director Neil Jordan compensates for a lumbering plot by honoring the literate, Romantic qualities of Rice’s screenplay. Considered a disappointment while being embraced by Rice’s loyal followers, the movie is too slow to be a satisfying thriller, but it is definitely one of the most lavish, intelligent horror films ever made. —Jeff Shannon

Barnes and Noble

This sumptuously mounted adaptation of Anne Rice’s bestselling novel brings her most intriguing character, the vampire Lestat, to life in the person of matinee idol Tom Cruise. Rice partisans initially balked upon hearing that Cruise had been cast, but his charismatic presence strengthened the picture and disarmed most of his critics. Brad Pitt plays Louis, a sensitive young man who reveals to a reporter (Christian Slater) the story of his troubled, 200-year existence as a vampire, beginning with his induction into that unnatural fraternity by the courtly Lestat. The film, which travels to Europe and back over the course of centuries, is most compelling in its exploration of the alternative family formed by Lestat, Louis, and child vampire, Claudia (Kirsten Dunst in an impressive performance). As directed by Neil Jordan (The Crying Game), Interview is slow going at times, but it features a terrific cast and possesses an eerily hypnotic quality that will appeal to horror-movie lovers in general and Rice fans in particular. Ed Hulse

Related Works

Album:Interview With The Vampire: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack

Interview With The Vampire: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack

Elliot Goldenthal

Elliot Goldenthal’s score perfectly captures the mood of the film, from the opening notes of “Libera Me” to the reprise of “Born to Darkness” at the end. He builds on a few basic themes, adding excitement to the mix with the high-intensity “Louis’ Revenge” and “Claudia’s Allegro Agitato.” As some of the track titles suggest, Goldenthal uses classical themes and techniques to compose his music, which works nicely. So well, in fact, that the Guns n Roses’ rendition of “Sympathy for the Devil,” appropriate as it was in the film, sounds like an afterthought here. The…

Book:Interview with the Vampire: Book 1 of the Vampire Chronicles

Interview with the Vampire: Book 1 of the Vampire Chronicles

Anne Rice

The time is now.

We are in a small room with the vampire, face to face, as he speaks—as he pours out the hypnotic, shocking, moving, and erotically charged confessions of his first two hundred years as one of the living dead…

He speaks quietly, plainly, even gently…carrying us back to the night when he departed human existence as heir—young, romantic, cultivated—to a great Louisiana plantation, and was inducted by the radiant and sinister Lestat into the other, the “endless,” life…learning first to sustain himself on the blood of cocks and rats caught in the raffish streets of New Orleans, then on the blood of human beings…to the years when, moving away from his final human ties under the tutelage of the hated yet necessary Lestat, he gradually embraces the habits, hungers, feelings of vampirism: the detachment, the hardened will, the “superior”…[more]

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