Film: Lilo & Stitch

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Film:

Lilo & Stitch

Director: Dean DeBlois, Chris Sanders
Honors:
Genres:
Distributor: Walt Disney Video

Warm, funny, and imaginative, Lilo & Stitch is the best animated feature the Walt Disney Studios have produced in years. On the planet Turo, mad scientist Jumba Jookiba (voice by David Ogden Stiers) has created a miniature monster programmed for destruction. When the monster escapes to Earth, it’s adopted as a pet and named “Stitch” by Lilo (Daveigh Chase), a lonely little Hawaiian girl. Lilo and her older sister Nani (Tia Carrere) have been struggling to stay together since their parents died. Stitch and Lilo share some hilarious adventures, evading…

Reviews

Amazon.com

Warm, funny, and imaginative, Lilo & Stitch is the best animated feature the Walt Disney Studios have produced in years. On the planet Turo, mad scientist Jumba Jookiba (voice by David Ogden Stiers) has created a miniature monster programmed for destruction. When the monster escapes to Earth, it’s adopted as a pet and named “Stitch” by Lilo (Daveigh Chase), a lonely little Hawaiian girl. Lilo and her older sister Nani (Tia Carrere) have been struggling to stay together since their parents died. Stitch and Lilo share some hilarious adventures, evading welfare officer Cobra Bubbles (Ving Rhames) and galactic police agents. They learn the timely lesson that a family can be something you’re born into—or something you assemble. A warmth and sincerity that recall The Iron Giant and the films of Hiyao Miyazaki make Lilo a delightful fantasy adults and children can truly enjoy together. —Charles Solomon

Barnes and Noble

Disney has never before unleashed an animated character like the helium-voiced Stitch, which makes Lilo & Stitch the most refreshingly out-of-this-world film from the House of Mouse in quite a while. Filled with anarchic humor and stuffed to the pelvis with Elvis Presley songs, it tells the heartwarming story of an extraterrestrial science experiment gone awry, leaving chaos and destruction in its wake. All this occurs in Hawaii, to boot, where Stitch proves to be the answer to one lonely girl’s prayers. Lilo, a young girl, lives with her loving but overwhelmed older sister, Nani (voiced by Tia Carrere). Lonely Lilo is something of an outcast, with a passion for the King and a penchant for mischief. “Send me the nicest angel you have,” she wishes upon a star. What she gets is Stitch, a.k.a. Experiment 626, who escapes his creators and crash-lands on our planet. His maker, Jumba (David Odgen Stiers), and a supposed Earth expert, Pleakley (Kevin McDonald of Kids in the Hall), are dispatched to retrieve him. But Lilo finds him first in a dog pound and adopts him. Her ill-fated attempts to tame the creature come at a time when a menacing social worker (Ving Rhames) gives Nani only three days to shape up the family’s untidy life or lose custody of Lilo. What “Hakuna Matata” was to The Lion King, “ohana” is to Lilo & Stitch. It means “family,” and to Nani and Lilo, that means “nobody gets left behind or forgotten.” As much as it subverts the time-honored Disney formula, Lilo & Stitch is refreshingly old school. For the first time since Dumbo, the animators used watercolors for the backgrounds. One of the most enjoyable Disney animated features in recent years, it rivals Aladdin, Hercules, and the surprise hit The Emperor’s New Groove for sheer fun. The DVD edition will have you all shook up with music videos of Elvis classics (performed by the A*Teens and Wynonna), deleted scenes, and those hilarious commercials in which Stitch wreaks havoc on such Disney icons as Ariel and Belle and the Beast. Donald Liebenson

Related Works

Album:Lilo & Stitch: Original Soundtrack

Lilo & Stitch: Original Soundtrack

Various Artists

If you thought Stitch was a ball of fire, wait till you see your kids bobbing, bouncing, and breaking bad to this soundtrack. The kid/Elvis Presley connection is by now a known quantity (check out the many kid-specific compilations devoted to the King), and the songs selected here couldn’t make better sense—”Stuck on You” sends ‘em out on the living-room dance floor and serves as this shake-and-shimmy session’s starter course; “Suspicious Minds” blows off its paranoia for packs of precocious lip-synchers; “Heartbreak Hotel” will have to adjust its check-out time;…

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