Film: The Adventures of Baron Munchausen

Cover image
Film:

The Adventures of Baron Munchausen

Director: Terry Gilliam
Honors:
Genres:
Distributor: Sony Pictures

Monty Python’s Terry Gilliam (Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas) directs this wild, wild version of the stories of Baron Munchausen, pushing the limits of 1989 special effects technology to bring us such sights as a horse divided in half and running around in two parts, and a giant Robin Williams with his head flying off his shoulders. Basically, this is a treat for Gilliam fans, as the sustaining idea of the film runs out of steam, and manic energy alone keeps the momentum going. Casual viewers might find it tedious after awhile. There are nice parts for…

Reviews

Amazon.com

Monty Python’s Terry Gilliam (Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas) directs this wild, wild version of the stories of Baron Munchausen, pushing the limits of 1989 special effects technology to bring us such sights as a horse divided in half and running around in two parts, and a giant Robin Williams with his head flying off his shoulders. Basically, this is a treat for Gilliam fans, as the sustaining idea of the film runs out of steam, and manic energy alone keeps the momentum going. Casual viewers might find it tedious after awhile. There are nice parts for fellow Python Eric Idle, as well as Sting, Alison Steadman, and Uma Thurman as a dazzlingly beautiful Venus on a half-shell. Gilliam had greater artistic and commercial success with Brazil, The Fisher King, and 12 Monkeys. —Tom Keogh

Related Works

Book:The Adventures of Baron Munchausen

The Adventures of Baron Munchausen

Rudolf Erich Raspe

A certain eighteenth-century German noble ventured abroad and returned with a series of amusingly outrageous stories. Baron Munchausen’s astounding feats included riding cannonballs, traveling to the Moon, and pulling himself out of a bog by his own hair. Listeners delighted in hearing about these unlikely adventures, and by the nineteenth century, the tales had been translated into numerous languages. The Baron’s definitive visual image belongs to Gustave Doré, the artist famed for his engravings of scenes from the Divine Comedy, Don Quixote, and other literary classics. Doré’s theatrical illustrations perfectly recreate the stories’ picaresque humor.

Views: 895 • Modified: • Elapsed: 0.147 sec