Honor roll: International Horror Guild Award for Nonfiction

Each of these books has been nominated for an International Horror Guild Award for Nonfiction. They are ranked by honors received.

Book:The Devil in the White City

The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America

Erik Larson

Two men, each handsome and unusually adept at his chosen work, embodied an element of the great dynamic that characterized America’s rush toward the twentieth century. The architect was Daniel Hudson Burnham, the fair’s brilliant director of works and the builder of many of the country’s most important structures, including the Flatiron Building in New York and Union Station in Washington, D.C. The murderer was Henry H. Holmes, a young doctor who, in a malign parody of the White City, built his “World’s Fair Hotel” just west of the fairgrounds—a torture palace complete with dissection table, gas chamber, and 3,000-degree crematorium. Burnham overcame tremendous obstacles and tragedies as he organized the talents of Frederick Law Olmsted, Charles McKim, Louis Sullivan, and others to transform swampy Jackson Park into the White City, while Holmes used the attraction of the great fair and his own satanic charms to lure scores of young women to their deaths. What makes the story all the more chilling is…[more]

Book:Ramsey Campbell, Probably

Ramsey Campbell, Probably: On Horror and Sundry Fantasies

Ramsey Campbell

Ramsey Campbell, Probably collects 140,000 words of Campbell’s non-fiction from the last three decades.

The subjects range from the perils of authorship to the delights of amateur fiction and film, from drugs to nightmares, from the Highgate Vampire to the Dracula Society’s marching song. Friends are remembered, and so is Mary Whitehouse. A seminal study of English schoolgirl spanking on video is brought up to date. Many thoughts on the history of horror fiction are included. At last it is revealed why Harlan Ellison is responsible.

May the reader variously laugh, weep, ponder, disagree and turn uneasily in bed.

Book:Gospel of the Living Dead

Gospel of the Living Dead: George Romero's Visions of Hell on Earth

Kim Paffenroth

This volume connects American social and religious views with the classic American movie genre of the zombie horror film. For nearly forty years, the films of George A. Romero have presented viewers with hellish visions of our world overrun by flesh-eating ghouls. This study proves that Romero’s films, like apocalyptic literature or Dante’s Commedia, go beyond the surface experience of repulsion to probe deeper questions of human nature and purpose, often giving a chilling and darkly humorous critique of modern, secular America.

Book:Horror: Another 100 Best Books

Horror: Another 100 Best Books

Stephen Jones, Kim Newman

Horror: Another 100 Best Books features one hundred of the top names in the horror field discussing one hundred of the most spine-chilling novels ever written. Each entry includes a synopsis of the work as well as publication history, biographical information about the author of each title, and recommended reading and biographical notes on the contributor. Author Ramsey Campbell also offers a new foreword to the book describing the evolution of horror over the past two decades — from the way it’s written by a crop of new and exciting writers to the way it’s received by a new market of readers. Horror: Another 100 Best Books will be the definitive guide to the tremendous library of horror fiction available today—a reference that no fan can live without.

Book:Mr. Fox and Other Feral Tales

Mr. Fox: and Other Feral Tales

Norman Partridge

Originally published in 1992, Mr. Fox and Other Feral Tales introduced a fresh voice to horror literature. Norman Partridge's first collection cemented Partridge's place as an exciting new talent in a generation of dark dreamers that included Poppy Z. Brite, Brian Hodge, and Bentley Little.

Book:At the Foot of the Story Tree

At the Foot of the Story Tree

Bill Sheehan

At the Foot of the Story Tree (a title which should be familiar to readers of Shadowland) is an old-fashioned work of criticism that takes a hard—and hopefully thorough—look at the entire body of Peter Straub’s fiction, from his relatively obscure mainstream novel, Marriages, through his ambitious new supernatural thriller, Mr. X, and from the shorter fiction collected in Houses Without Doors through such recent, still uncollected stories as the Stoker Award-winning “Mr. Clubb and Mr. Cuff.” Book by book, story by story, I have done my best to untangle the complexities of Straub’s fiction, to isolate and illuminate its central concerns, and to articulate my highly personal sense of its unique—and, I believe  enduring—value.

Whether or not I’ve achieved any of these objectives is not for me to say. Anyone who takes the time to read my book…[more]

Book:On Writing

On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft

Stephen King

“If you don’t have the time to read, you don’t have the time or the tools to write.”

In 1999, Stephen King began to write about his craft—and his life. By midyear, a widely reported accident jeopardized the survival of both. And in his months of recovery, the link between writing and living became more crucial than ever.

Rarely has a book on writing been so clear, so useful, and so revealing. On Writing begins with a mesmerizing account of King’s childhood and his uncannily early focus on writing to tell a story. A series of vivid memories from adolescence, college, and the struggling years that led up to his first novel, Carrie, will afford readers a fresh and often very funny perspective on the formation of a writer. King next turns to the basic tools of his trade—how to sharpen and multiply them through use, and how the writer must always have them close at hand. He takes the reader through crucial aspects of the writer’s art…[more]

Book:Cinema Macabre

Cinema Macabre

Mark Morris

A collection of essays on horror cinema from Nosferatu (1922) to The Sixth Sense (1999).

Book:Hanging Out With the Dream King

Hanging Out With the Dream King: Interviews with Neil Gaiman and His Collaborators

Joe McCabe

The most intimate look yet into the life and mind of the bestselling author and creator of The Sandman.

Neil Gaiman is one of the most successful and versatile writers working today. He has become renowned not only for the consistently high quality of his writing but for his mastery of many media. He is an award-winning comic book writer (Sandman), novelist (American Gods), children’s book author (The Wolves in the Walls), and television screenwriter (Neverwhere). Yet with all the fans hungry to know more about his work, there has not yet been a single major nonfiction book covering Gaiman’s entire creative output. Until now.

Hanging Out With the Dream King: Conversations With Neil Gaiman and His Collaborators presents a thorough look at Gaiman’s work not only through his eyes, but through the eyes of his many collaborators. Artists, writers, editors, musicians—over…[more]

Book:Supernatural Fiction Writers

Supernatural Fiction Writers: Contemporary Fantasy and Horror

Richard Bleiler

This two-volume set for high school students, college undergraduates, and teachers and other nonspecialists contains essays on 116 contemporary supernatural fiction writers whose prose the editor considers equal to, if not superior to, that of writers who have been granted mainstream acceptance. Entries are approximately seven to 12 pages in length and cover all aspects of each writer’s career. They also address questions such as the literary value of these genres of fiction, and whether the science fiction or horror label discourages taking such work seriously. Each essay is followed by a bibliography of primary works, a critical and biographical bibliography citing books and articles, and lists of interviews and book reviews.

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