Honor roll: Kate Greenaway Medal

Each of these books has been nominated for a Kate Greenaway Medal. They are ranked by honors received.

Book:The Graveyard Book

The Graveyard Book

Neil Gaiman, Dave McKean, Chris Riddell

Nobody Owens, known to his friends as Bod, is a normal boy.

He would be completely normal if he didn’t live in a sprawling graveyard, being raised and educated by ghosts, with a solitary guardian who belongs to neither the world of the living nor of the dead.

There are dangers and adventures in the graveyard for a boy-an ancient Indigo Man beneath the hill, a gateway to a desert leading to an abandoned city of ghouls, the strange and terrible menace of the Sleer.

But if Bod leaves the graveyard, then he will come under attack from the man Jack—who has already killed Bod’s family….

Beloved master storyteller Neil Gaiman returns with a luminous new novel for the audience that embraced his New York Times bestselling modern classic coraline. Magical, terrifying, and filled with breathtaking adventures, the graveyard book is sure to enthrall readers of all ages.

Book:A Monster Calls

A Monster Calls

Patrick Ness, Jim Kay

An unflinching, darkly funny, and deeply moving story of a boy, his seriously ill mother, and an unexpected monstrous visitor.

At seven minutes past midnight, thirteen-year-old Conor wakes to find a monster outside his bedroom window. But it isn’t the monster Conor’s been expecting—he’s been expecting the one from his nightmare, the nightmare he’s had nearly every night since his mother started her treatments. The monster in his backyard is different. It’s ancient. And wild. And it wants something from Conor. Something terrible and dangerous. It wants the truth.

From the final idea of award-winning author Siobhan Dowd—whose premature death from cancer prevented her from writing it herself—Patrick Ness has spun a haunting and darkly funny novel of mischief, loss, and monsters both real and imagined.

Book:Mr. Gumpy's Outing

Mr. Gumpy's Outing

John Burningham

One sunny day Mr. Gumpy decides to take a ride in his small boat. It’s a perfect idea for a lovely summer day, and soon he is joined by children, a rabbit, a cat, a pig, and a host of other friends. But when the goat kicks, the chickens flap, the dog teases the cat and the children squabble—the boat tips into the water and everyone tumbles out. No one minds getting wet on such a nice day, though, especially since Mr. Gumpy invites everyone to his house for tea.

Book:Black Dog (Levi Pinfold)

Black Dog

Levi Pinfold

An enormous black dog and a very tiny little girl star in this offbeat tale about confronting one’s fears.

When a huge black dog appears outside the Hope family home, each member of the household sees it and hides. Only Small, the youngest Hope, has the courage to face the black dog, who might not be as frightening as everyone else thinks.

Book:Wolves

Wolves

Emily Gravett

Rabbit borrows a book about wolves from the library. Straightforward enough. But it's not long before a sinister figure with sharp claws and a bushy tail starts to creep right off the pages. You won't believe your eyes especially if you're a rabbit.

Brilliantly witty, with amazing artwork, two surprise endings, plus fun novelty elements, "Wolves" created a real buzz of excitement among critics and booksellers alike on first publication in 2005.

Book:Traction Man Is Here!

Traction Man Is Here!

Mini Grey

Traction Man—wearing combat boots, battle pants, and his warfare shirt—comes in a box, but very quickly finds the way into the imagination of his lucky boy owner. This superhero searches for the Lost Wreck of the Sieve as the boy makes a game of doing the dishes, and later in the bathtub, he conquers the Mysterious Toes that are stealing his pet, the brave little Scrubbing Brush. These are just a few of the action-packed adventures played out by the boy and his new toy that may not be able to leap tall buildings in a single bound, but can vanquish all manner of villains lurking around the house. Mini Grey’s story in words and pictures is an irresistible invitation to the private world of a child’s play.

Book:I Want My Hat Back

I Want My Hat Back

Jon Klassen

A picture-book delight by a rising talent tells a cumulative tale with a mischievous twist.

The bear s hat is gone, and he wants it back. Patiently and politely, he asks the animals he comes across, one by one, whether they have seen it. Each animal says no, some more elaborately than others. But just as the bear begins to despond, a deer comes by and asks a simple question that sparks the bear s memory and renews his search with a vengeance. Told completely in dialogue, this delicious take on the classic repetitive tale plays out in sly illustrations laced with visual humor and winks at the reader with a wry irreverence that will have kids of all ages thrilled to be in on the joke.

Book:Can We Save the Tiger?

Can We Save the Tiger?

Martin Jenkins, Vicky White

The team behind the award-winning Ape returns with an inspiring look at a range of endangered species sure to engage every child who loves animals.

Tigers are pretty special—and so are ground iguanas and partula snails and even white-rumped vultures. But these and many other animals are in danger of disappearing altogether, joining the dodo, the marsupial wolf, the great auk, and countless other animals we will never see again. Using the experiences of a few endangered species as examples, Martin Jenkins highlights the ways human behavior can either threaten or conserve the amazing animals that share our planet. Vicky White’s stunning portraits of rare creatures offer a glimpse of nature’s grace and beauty—and give us a powerful reason to preserve it.

Book:Michael Rosen's Sad Book

Michael Rosen's Sad Book

Michael Rosen, Quentin Blake

Who is sad? Sad is anyone. It comes along and finds you.

We all have sad stuff. What makes Michael Rosen sad is thinking about his son, Eddie, who died. In this book he writes about his sadness, how it affects him, and some of the things he does to try to cope with it.

Book:The Shape Game

The Shape Game

Anthony Browne

The same family that had such an enlightening experience in Anthony Browne’s Zoo is now going to an art museum, Mom’s choice for her birthday treat. But wisecracking Dad and their two sons are skeptical about how much fun this trip will be, and they’re not quite sure what to make of the art. (“What on earth is that supposed to be?” asks Dad.) But, with Mom’s help, once the boys start really looking at the paintings, they begin to find what pleasures they contain. Most of the family leave with a new appreciation of art—Dad is just never going to get it—as well as a sketchbook. On the trip home, Mom teaches the boys—and readers—a drawing game, which one of her sons (this book’s author) has been playing ever since.

This new book is the product of Anthony Browne’s engagement as writer-and-illustrator-in-residence at the Tate Britain in London. There he worked with a thousand children from inner-city schools, teaching literature using the resources in the gallery—and playing the shape game. In his artwork for the book, he surreally transforms, in his signature style, some famous paintings in the Tate’s collection.

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