Honor roll: Randolph Caldecott Medal

Each of these books has been nominated for a Randolph Caldecott Medal. They are ranked by honors received.

Book:The Wall: Growing Up Behind the Iron Curtain

The Wall: Growing Up Behind the Iron Curtain

Peter Sís

“I was born at the beginning of it all, on the Red side—the Communist side—of the Iron Curtain.”

Through annotated illustrations, journals, maps, and dreamscapes, Peter Sís shows what life was like for a child who loved to draw, proudly wore the red scarf of a Young Pioneer, stood guard at the giant statue of Stalin, and believed whatever he was told to believe. But adolescence brought questions. Cracks began to appear in the Iron Curtain, and news from the West slowly filtered into the country. Sís learned about beat poetry, rock ’n’ roll, blue jeans, and Coca-Cola. He let his hair grow long, secretly read banned books, and joined a rock band. Then came the Prague Spring of 1968, and for a teenager who wanted to see the world and meet the Beatles, this was a magical time. It was short-lived, however, brought to a sudden and brutal end by the Soviet-led invasion. But this brief flowering had provided a glimpse of new possibilities—creativity could be discouraged but not easily…[more]

Book:The Invention of Hugo Cabret

The Invention of Hugo Cabret

Brian Selznick

Orphan, clock keeper, and thief, Hugo lives in the walls of a busy Paris train station, where his survival depends on secrets and anonymity. But when his world suddenly interlocks with an eccentric, bookish girl and a bitter old man who runs a toy booth in the station, Hugo’s undercover life, and his most precious secret, are put in jeopardy. A cryptic drawing, a treasured notebook, a stolen key, a mechanical man, and a hidden message from Hugo’s dead father form the backbone of this intricate, tender, and spellbinding mystery.

Book:Grandfather's Journey

Grandfather's Journey

Allen Say

Through compelling reminiscences of his grandfather’s life in America and Japan, Allen Say gives us a poignant acount of a family’s unique cross-cultural experience. He warmly conveys his own love for his two countries, and the strong and constant desire to be in both places at once.

Book:Lon Po Po

Lon Po Po: A Red-Riding Hood Story from China

Ed Young

This “gripping variation of Red Riding Hood…is an outstanding achievement that will be pored over again and again” (School Library Journal, starred review). “The illustrations seem to throb with the mystery and terror of the wolf.”—The Horn Book, starred review.

Book:Noah's Ark (Peter Spier)

Noah's Ark

Peter Spier

The bee and the fox, the sheep and the ox—two of each kind trudged aboard Noah’s famous vessel. Peter Spier uses his own translation of a seventeenth-century Dutch poem about this most famous menagerie.

Book:Bill Peet: An Autobiography

Bill Peet: An Autobiography

Bill Peet

Bill Peet tells his life story, including his years with Disney, with illustrations on every page.

Book:Extra Yarn

Extra Yarn

Mac Barnett, Jon Klassen

With a supply of yarn that never runs out, Annabelle knits for everyone and everything in town until an evil archduke decides he wants the yarn for himself.

Book:Dave the Potter: Artist, Poet, Slave

Dave the Potter: Artist, Poet, Slave

Laban Carrick Hill, Bryan Collier

To us
it is just dirt,
the ground we walk on…
But to Dave
it was clay,
the plain and basic stuff
upon which he formed a life
as a slave nearly 200 years ago.…[more]
Book:The Lion & the Mouse

The Lion & the Mouse

Jerry Pinkney

In award-winning artist Jerry Pinkney’s wordless adaptation of one of Aesop’s most beloved fables, an unlikely pair learn that no act of kindness is ever wasted. After a ferocious lion spares a cowering mouse that he’d planned to eat, the mouse later comes to his rescue, freeing him from a poacher’s trap. With vivid depictions of the landscape of the African Serengeti and expressively-drawn characters, Pinkney makes this a truly special retelling, and his stunning pictures speak volumes.

Book:Moses: When Harriet Tubman Led Her People to Freedom

Moses: When Harriet Tubman Led Her People to Freedom

Carole Boston Weatherford, Kadir Nelson

“I set the North Star in the heavens and I mean for you to be free…”

Born into slavery, Harriet Tubman hears these words from God one summer night and decides to leave her husband and family behind and escape. Taking with her only her faith, she must creep through woods with hounds at her heels, sleep for days in a potato hole, and trust people who could have easily turned her in.

But she was never alone.

In lyrical text, Carole Boston Weatherford describes Tubman’s spiritual journey as she hears the voice of God guiding her North to freedom on that very first trip to escape the brutal practice of forced servitude. Tubman, courageous and compassionate, and deeply religious, would take nineteen subsequent trips back South, never being caught, but none as profound as this first.…[more]

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