Honor roll: Edgar Allan Poe Award® for Best Novel

Each of these books has been nominated for an Edgar Allan Poe Award® for Best Novel. They are ranked by honors received.

Book:Eye of the Needle

Eye of the Needle

Ken Follett

One enemy spy knows the secret if the Allies’ greatest deception, a brilliant aristocrat and ruthless assassin—code name: “The Needle”—who holds the key to the ultimate Nazi victory. Only one person stands in his way: a lonely Englishwoman on an isolated island, who is coming to love the killer who has mysteriously entered her life.

Ken Follett’s unsurpassed and unforgettable masterwork of suspense, intrigue, and dangerous machinations of the human heart.

Book:Catch Me, Kill Me

Catch Me, Kill Me

William H. Hallahan

Book:Promised Land

Promised Land: A Spenser Novel

Robert B. Parker

Spenser is good at finding things. But this time he has a client out on Cape Cod who is in over his head. Harvey Shepard has lost his pretty wife—and a very pretty quarter million bucks in real estate. Now a loan shark is putting on the bite.

Spenser finds himself doing a slow burn in the Cape Cod sun. The wife has turned up as a hot suspect in a case of murder one…the in-hock hubby has 24 hours before the mob makes him dead…and suddenly Spenser is in so deep that the only way out is so risky it makes dying look like a sure thing.

“Spenser is the sassiest, funniest, most-enjoyable-to-read private eye around today.” (The Cincinnati Post)

Book:Hopscotch (Brian Garfield)

Hopscotch

Brian Garfield

Since being forced into retirement by the CIA, Miles Kendig had tried everything in an effort to satisfy his hunger for excitement. But he could not recreate the ultimate conflict of life or death with no rules, the experience of pitting himself against the enemy with no holds barred.

Despite his bitterness at being shelved by the CIA, Miles was still scrupulously American—so when he found himself tempted by an offer from the Russians, he realized the time had come for him to put up or give up.

Miles has been waiting, carefully planning, for years—and, finally, he’s ready. By threatening to expose the espionage secrets of the major powers, he set himself up as the quarry of an international manhunt. Now he would either prove to himself that after twenty-five years of playing the game he was still a winner, or he would meet his death at the hands of younger men.

Book:Peter's Pence

Peter's Pence

Jon Cleary

Book:Dance Hall of the Dead

Dance Hall of the Dead

Tony Hillerman

Two young boys suddenly disappear. One of them, a Zuni, leaves a pool of blood behind. Lt. Joe Leaphorn of the Navajo Tribal Police tracks the brutal killer. Three things complicate the search: an archeological dig, a steel hypodermic needle, and the strange laws of the Zuni.

Compelling, terrifying, and highly suspenseful, Dance Hall of the Dead never relents from first page til last.

Book:The Lingala Code

The Lingala Code

Warren Kiefer

Book:The Day of the Jackal

The Day of the Jackal

Frederick Forsyth

The Jackal. A tall, blond Englishman with  opaque, gray eyes. A killer at the top of his  profession. A man unknown to any secret service in the  world. An assassin with a contract to kill the  world’s most heavily guarded man.

One  man with a rifle who can change the course of  history. One man whose mission is so secretive not  even his employers know his name. And as the  minutes count down to the final act of execution, it  seems that there is no power on earth that can stop  the Jackal.

Book:The Laughing Policeman

The Laughing Policeman: A Martin Beck Police Mystery

Maj Sjöwall, Per Wahlöö

With its wonderfully observed lawmen (including the inimitable Martin Beck), its brilliantly rendered felons and their murky Stockholm underworld, and its deftly engineered plot, The Laughing Policeman is a classic of the police procedural and “must reading for anyone who claims to be [a student] of the best detective fiction” (Saturday Review).

Book:Forfeit

Forfeit

Dick Francis

James Tyron, a racing reporter for a London scandal sheet, knew that fellow writer Bert Chekov was a drunk, but he always thought he was an honest one. But when Bert suddenly died in an “accidental” fall from a window, Tyrone suspeced the clues to his death might be found in some suspicious columns he’d written touting can’t lose horses—who myseriously failed to show up on race day. With his own professional and private lives in a chaotic jumble, Tyrone knew he’d have find a way to prove that Chekov was murdered. Be he didn’t know the terrifying risk he was unwittingly about to take….

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