Honor roll: Golden Kite Picture Book Text Award

Each of these books has been nominated for a Golden Kite Picture Book Text Award. They are ranked by honors received.

Book:Apples to Oregon

Apples to Oregon: Being the (Slightly) True Narrative of How a Brave Pioneer Father Brought Apples, Peaches, Pears, Plums, Grapes, and Cherries (and Children) Across the Plains

Deborah Hopkinson, Nancy Carpenter

Apples, ho!

When Papa decides to pull up roots and move from Iowa to Oregon, he can’t bear to leave his precious apple trees behind. Or his peaches, plums, grapes, cherries, and pears. Oh, and he takes his family along too. But the trail is cruel — first there’s a river to cross that’s wider than Texas… and then there are hailstones as big as plums… and there’s even a drought, sure to crisp the cherries. Those poor pippins! Luckily Delicious (the nonedible apple of Daddy’s eye) is strong — as young ’uns raised on apples are — and won’t let anything stop her father’s darling saps from tasting the sweet Oregon soil.

Here’s a hilarious tall tale — from the team that brought you Fannie in the Kitchen — that’s loosely based on the life of a real fruiting pioneer.

Book:The Dirty Cowboy

The Dirty Cowboy

Amy Timberlake, Adam Rex

This ol’ boy needs a bath!

After he finds a tumbleweed in his chaps and the numerous bugs buzzing around him affect his hearing, the cowboy decides it’s time to head to the river. Once there, he peels off all his clothes and tells his trusty old dog to guard them against strangers. He takes a refreshing bath and emerges clean as corn — but so fresh-smelling that his dog doesn’t recognize him! Negotiations over the return of the clothes prove fruitless. A wrestling match ensues in a tale that grows taller by the sentence, climaxing in a fabric-speckled dust devil.

Amy Timberlake has inserted a Western twang into this tale of filth and friendship, and Adam Rex has found many creative means of bodily concealment in his expressive, comical paintings.

Book:George Hogglesberry, Grade School Alien

George Hogglesberry, Grade School Alien

Sarah Wilson, Chad Cameron

It’s a shaky landing for George Hogglesberry as he begins his first day of school on a new planet. What if nobody likes him? What if his ears fall off at recess? What if he turns into a tomato during the fall play? He never had to worry about any of these things back on Frollop II. But with the help of his gentle new teacher and understanding classmates, George may find that even a boy from across the galaxy can feel at home on planet earth.

Book:The Shoe Tree of Chagrin

The Shoe Tree of Chagrin: A Christmas Story

J. Patrick Lewis, Chris Sheban

The barn-tall old plainswoman Susannah DeClare braves deep snow and icy weather to fulfill her promise to deliver a load of handmade shoes to Chagrin Falls, Ohio, by Christmas.

Book:River Friendly, River Wild

River Friendly, River Wild

Jane Kurtz, Neil Brennan

On TV we watch our city where people navigate the river-streets in any way they can….
“Look.” Max points. “it’s Sarah’s house.”
All I see is roof.

In searing personal poems, Jane Kurtz explores what it’s like to struggle through a flood and pull your life together afterward. Inspired by Kurtz’s own flood experience, this tale is realistic and unforgettable. Not just a moving story of one girl’s courage, River Friendly, River Wild is a tribute to everyone who’s ever faced great loss.

Book:A Band of Angels

A Band of Angels: A Story Inspired By The Jubilee Singers

Deborah Hopkinson, Raúl Colón

A Band of Angels is fiction, but it is based on real events and people. The character of Ella was inspired by Ella Sheppard Moore, who was born February 4, 1851, in Nashville, Tennessee. Her father was able to free himself and young Ella from slavery, but before he could buy freedom for Ella’s mother she was sold away. Ella was raised in Cincinnati, where she took music lessons. At fifteen, she was left penniless when her father died. She arrived at Fisk School in 1868 with only six dollars.

Fisk was opened in 1866 as a school for former slaves and began offering college classes in 1871. That year, in a desperate attempt to save Fisk from closing, a music teacher named George White set out with a group of students on a singing tour to raise money. Although at first they only sang popular music of the day, they soon became famous for introducing spirituals to the world. …[more]

Book:Old Elm Speaks

Old Elm Speaks: Tree Poems

Kristine O'Connell George, Kate Kiesler

This tree across the stream is a trickier bridge
than it might seem…

The original poems in this lovely, simple collection celebrate every aspect of trees in a variety of poetic forms including free verse, rhyme, and haiku....Kiesler's warm oil paintings beautifully complement the poems, making for a totally satisfying experience that is sure to be a favorite.

The author of The Great From Race and Other Poems has created a collection of short poems that celebrate trees and the amazing variety of ways they touch our lives. Deceptively simple verses reveal what trees think about and what they say to one another, as well as how they look and all the things they do for us. Humor and an unerring ear for the sounds of language make these poems an irresistible read-aloud; the luminous oil paintings evoke a country setting and the children who enjoy it through the year.

Book:The Paper Dragon

The Paper Dragon

Marguerite W. Davol, Robert Sabuda

Mi Fei is a humble painter of scrolls. Between each day’s sunrise and sunset, he paints scenes of the gods and their festivals’ portraits of heroes and their deeds. Although the scrolls bring him fame, Mi Fei is content to live in his village, surrounded by people he loves.

But one day a messenger enters the village with terrible news: the dragon Sui Jen has awakened from its hundred years’ sleep and is destroying everything in its path. Someone must find a way to return Sui Jen to its slumber. To the villagers, only one among them is wise enough to confront the scaly beast—Mi Fei.

The power of the artist’s vision and the ever-sustaining nature of love are brought together in Marguerite W. Davol’s beautiful story, strikingly interpreted by Robert Sabuda in a series of gatefold illustrations that convey the storytelling majesty of the Chinese narrative scrollmaker’s art.

Book:Saving Sweetness

Saving Sweetness

Diane Stanley, G. Brian Karas

When Sweetness, the ittiest bittiest orphan in Ms. Sump’s orphanage, runs away, it’s up to the sheriff to find her and bring her back. The only problem is, Sweetness doesn’t want to be saved. She’d rather take her chances with Coyote Pete, the nastiest desperado in the Wild West, than face going back to Ms. Sump. So each time the sheriff catches up to her, she runs away again! How the sheriff finally finds a way to save Sweetness-for good-makes for a hilariously heartwarming story that’s sure to please.

Book:A Leaf Can Be

A Leaf Can Be

Laura Purdie Salas, Violeta Dabija

Find out about the many roles leaves play in this poetic exploration of leaves throughout the year.

A leaf can be a…
Shade spiller
Mouth filler
Tree topper
Rain stopper
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